Balewagon Operation and Troubleshooting/Repair - Page 3 - Machinery - HayTalk - Hay & Forage Community - Page 3

Jump to content




Photo
- - - - -

Balewagon Operation and Troubleshooting/Repair


  • Please log in to reply
129 replies to this topic

#41 darren

darren

    Member

  • Members
  • 47 posts
  • Locationse ohio

Posted 07 May 2010 - 07:59 PM

My barns are on a 4% slope with concrete floor.I will have to stack one down hill and the other up hill. Will this be a big problem or will stack poles hold them up?
They are 200 foot long and 90 feet wide each.

#42 rob_cook2001

rob_cook2001

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 89 posts

Posted 07 May 2010 - 09:19 PM

If you need to stack on a hill you should stack uphill. But since your only at 4% you should be fine stacking down hill to. Just make sure to use your poles. Concrete is a little hard on your load rack and rolling rack fingers but you should be ok. Your going to be able to store a LOT of hay in those sheds.
Robert
  • darren likes this

#43 hay hauler

hay hauler

    Hay Master

  • Members
  • 435 posts
  • LocationCentral Oregon

Posted 08 May 2010 - 11:42 PM

I see no problem. Your stack poles wont want to stay in place, but use them. I like to stack down hill, with stack poles.... seems to stay tighter but a short stack at the end of the pile will help the front not fall off over time.
  • darren likes this

#44 H&S Farms

H&S Farms

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • 11 posts

Posted 11 May 2010 - 08:20 PM

Here's a question. 2 actually. I have a nh 1049s & recently got a 1069. On the 1049 I am having a problem with the second table not going all the way up. As soon as the table raises above the trip lever it stops. I've tried adjusting the springs on the valve, but not to the desired effect yet, any info would be much appreciated.

Second question, on the 1069 how in the world do I get the rolling rack back to the top? My dad purchased this thing at an auction and everything else seems to be in good working condition. I was going to put it in the field today but.... help here would also be greatly appreciated.

#45 darren

darren

    Member

  • Members
  • 47 posts
  • Locationse ohio

Posted 11 May 2010 - 09:09 PM

After you dump , lower the table and continue to hold lever in lower position.This should bring the rack forward.

#46 rob_cook2001

rob_cook2001

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 89 posts

Posted 11 May 2010 - 09:45 PM

My 1069 has a separate control lever for the rolling rack. On your 1049 it sounds like a issue with your linkage. Like your trip lever is bouncing back to hard and canceling it. Does the table just stop or drop back down to the frame?
Robert

#47 H&S Farms

H&S Farms

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • 11 posts

Posted 12 May 2010 - 07:09 PM

My 1069 has a separate control lever for the rolling rack. On your 1049 it sounds like a issue with your linkage. Like your trip lever is bouncing back to hard and canceling it. Does the table just stop or drop back down to the frame?
Robert


on the 1049 it just stops once the lever returns. I have to finish the cycle using the lever.

As for the 1069, talked to roeder imp. KS today and it was a pretty simple fix. I had to remove the cover on the back side of the valve body and free the pool up. Luckily for me I believe it was just ceased to the cover cause as soon as I removed it it freed up. Mine has a seperate lever as well.

I love the 1069 vs my old 1049! (so far) moved around 1200 bales with it today, and that's a sweeet machine!

#48 NRC51

NRC51

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • 5 posts
  • LocationTexas

Posted 12 May 2010 - 10:04 PM

NRC51,

How much twine do you use doing this in a year?

If you buy a box of the large square bale twine it will last you a long time because you can reuse it. I use the twine cut from the already baled big squares that the dairies here feed. It takes three pieces tied together for each layer you tie. I keep those to reuse each year. You make a loop in the end and that is really the only place they wear. I'll get a picture and post it on here.

#49 OneManShow

OneManShow

    Hay Master

  • Members
  • 148 posts
  • LocationWestern Oregon

Posted 02 June 2010 - 04:12 PM

We run a 1075 with a 1085 computer and a broken air conditioner. Had a problem with the rolling rack travelling to the rear on its own. I found a broken spring in the rolling rack relief valve and replaced it-couldn't believe the dealer had it! Even set as tight as I could get it, when we stack timothy hay or other heavy bales, the rack still moved back on it's own a bit-enough so the block would lean a bit. I replaced the whole valve last year and almost fixed the problem-except with heavy bales. I'm thinking about putting a shim under the spring to increase the setting on the relief valve. I already lower the stack manually anyhow so it would make a difference that way. Has anyone else had a problem with this?

#50 cottonwood haymaker

cottonwood haymaker

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • 1 posts

Posted 03 June 2010 - 11:32 PM

I need help. I have a NH 1032 balewagon. After repacking the cylinder that raises the first table, the cylinder to raise the bale pickup stopped raising (it does still pick up bales). Previously this cylinder did operate correctly. I removed this cylinder, had the seals replaced and still it does not lift the bale pickup. I disconnected the hose going to the cylinder, operated the controls, and oil under pressure ran through the hose. I tried to remove the constrictor and check for blockage in the hole but the constrictor would not unscrew all the way. All the other cylinders seem to operate correctly. Any suggestions would be appreciated. If this is the wrong thread for this, please tell me where to post it.

#51 OneManShow

OneManShow

    Hay Master

  • Members
  • 148 posts
  • LocationWestern Oregon

Posted 05 June 2010 - 05:16 PM

Have you tried bleeding the cylinder? You may have gotten some air in system when you changed the other cylinder. Have you also tried holding the lever all the way back (to lift the pickup head) for a awhile to see if the cylinder will bleed itself? Our 1048S sometimes needs some time with the handle pulled back before the pick-up head will lift. Hope this helps.

#52 Blue Duck

Blue Duck

    www.blueduckmachine.com

  • Members
  • 288 posts
  • Locationsouth central Kansas

Posted 07 July 2010 - 06:49 PM

I've read through all these posts and while I have run both Accumulators and bale wagons, the bale wagon to me is the faster way to stack and unstack. Grass hay was always a nightmare because you never knew if a stack would still be standing when you came back with the next load. One night in winter I woke up and said I can't believe I never thought of that. This is what popped into my head.
I now take the twine that is used on big square bales( can be used stuff tied together) and when the second table is loaded I stop and wrap the twine once around the 15 bales and tie it off. I do this on 1,4,7 layers and no longer use the auto tie feature. I no longer have to worry about stacks falling over and the bottom layer never pulls out if the rack happens not to slide out easily.
It may take a few minutes longer when making a load but the rest is a real big relief and you'll love the straight stacks. Depending on the bales you can do more rows or put 2 strings on the #1 row if needed.


I gave the twine a try on my straw this year. I have a 1044 without auto-tie and IMHO the twine is the only way to go! I built a twine box out of an old grease barrel and attached it to one of the shafts on the side boards. A hundred feet of twine for every load (120 bales) is well worth the expense to have nice stacks, no moving bales to make tie layers, and no tie layers when picking them up with the bale claw.

#53 customhaystacking

customhaystacking

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • 14 posts

Posted 13 July 2010 - 11:57 PM

The Firestones are up to about $1300, I tried a Michelin tire that was supposed to fit, it was a little bigger and looked ok mounted, but with 4.5 ton of hay they rubbed the load rack, I had them take them off...bad part was that one of the tires was ruined when it was taken off, so I was forced to buy the Firestone...and They boned me for the cost of Shipping the tires back...$150...I won't be doing business with them anymore, the only other way is to switch to 22.5 wheels...too much $$$ for me!

#54 customhaystacking

customhaystacking

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • 14 posts

Posted 14 July 2010 - 12:13 AM

It sounds like most of you guys bale 36" bales, we do 48" bales, two wide and with the 1095 I block stack almost 100% of the hay I pick-up. Block stacks almost never fall over, only if the guy bales to loose then the bales compress and the stack falls over. I go 10 high with 3 tie layers comes out at 97 bales (4.5 tons) a load. I started with a 1048S, so I know what its like to have a stack fall on you. I stack about 50-60K bales a season and last year I didn't have a single stack fall over. Sorry, I'm not bragging, just stating how awesome block stacks are. I find that one unloading a single load or starting a new stack you can tie some twine to the last layer front to back and it holds the top from separating and you don't have any bales fall of the top of the stack. I also keep a tire gauge in the cab, it cost me $1300 for a tire one year from a low tire that blew while transporting a load of hay down the roadway. Always check the tire pressure before hauling any distance!

#55 rob_cook2001

rob_cook2001

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 89 posts

Posted 15 July 2010 - 05:52 PM

Welcome to the forum Customhaystacking. Stacking is my main thing to, did about 85-90k last year. Don't see many 2 wide wagons around here. All the hay I stack is between 36in and 40inch.
Robert

#56 OneManShow

OneManShow

    Hay Master

  • Members
  • 148 posts
  • LocationWestern Oregon

Posted 23 July 2010 - 11:11 PM

We make a 47" bale and haul with a 1075. I make a 7 tier block and stack them 2 blocks high in the barn. I started with 1048S too-still have it-and I'd sell it if somebody could use her. I know some folks on the east side of the cascades who make "cowboy bales" and stack with a three wide machine. I guess they hand load the semi trucks too!

#57 rob_cook2001

rob_cook2001

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 89 posts

Posted 24 July 2010 - 11:32 AM

OneManShow.
A lot of us with these "cowboy bales" load with some type of a grapple, either a old farmhand or a new Steffin.
But I agree the hay squiezes you all run are cool as HE!!
Robert

#58 customhaystacking

customhaystacking

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • 14 posts

Posted 28 July 2010 - 08:08 PM

block stacking is the way to go! I do some 7 high squeeze blocks for a few customers, but most of it is 10 high block. I do mostly 2-tie, but when I stack 3-tie I love them too, 3-tie just stacks so nice if the bales are good!

#59 Robin Craig

Robin Craig

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • 18 posts

Posted 08 August 2010 - 06:38 PM

Howdy Folks,

Thought I would chime in on what we have learnt, this being our second season with the NH 1049S self propelled machine.

Please bear in mind we were not farmers until just over a year ago when the company I work for bought another farm 7 kilometers away on the same island and we pitched our renter off and "went to live the farming dream" making hay in small squares for the horse market.

We have two types of fields, existing grass hay and newly planted. The new planting of a custom hay mix is slowly expanding as we bring more field back from being left to go to seed for many years.

We cut with a NH 488 haybine, rake with a Miller Pro single head unit, sometimes ted with a used Fransgard tedder, bale with a NH 575 small square baler with 1/4 turn device, and finally collect with the Stack Cruiser.

We have a fabric covered barn 50' X 100' with a custom made back wall we built ourselves after the fiasco of tumbled bales last year.

We aim for 36" long bales but I have found that the floor of the barn is critical in having stacks stay up. We have a limestone floor and cover it with 6 mil poly vapour barrier to mitigate the moisture coming up from beneath. We did spread straw on top of the poly last year but you will have to see my other post to see what happened with that.

This year I re graded our floor to very level and have not had any problems so far this year, but its early yet as we are still on first cut, I know we are late, many other factors affecting.

The Stack Cruiser, I have found as everyone else has is not tolerant of variations in bale lengths. To compensate I have spread the sides a bit more and gone for speed of pick up. Last year I was a Jack In The Box onto the second table all the time, this year with a bit more wiggle room I am getting production.

Our machine was purchased used from Martin Warne from near Syrause NY state. he has been a gem on giving me advice by cell phone at critical times, a real gentleman.

All our kit spends its time under cover except under exceptional circumstances.

We collect bales within an hour or so of being baled when possible. If bales overnight in the field we manually turn them over at around 11 am onto dry ground and allow them to dry in the sun for at least an hour before we pick them up.

I have no idea which way the bales were laid as we zip around the field picking up as best we can moving the least distance to get the most bales.

rgds

Robin Craig

Edited by Robin Craig, 08 August 2010 - 06:49 PM.
spelling

  • hay hauler likes this

#60 jb63

jb63

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • 5 posts

Posted 18 September 2010 - 10:18 PM

i'm in western Or and have a 1048 s.I got tired of people saying they want hay ,but are too lazy to pick it up. So I dump a load at their barn and drive away.Old equipment allways has problems but mine are pretty well ironed out. I do have a question if anyone knows how to make the second chain move faster? I've had the stacker about 10 yr and that chain allways bugs me. Also I put a hillside kit on it ,and a plate steel with 3 or 4 bags of concrete on the rear end . When I first brought it home I couldn't even back up my drive and it's not that steep.




1 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users

× Sponsors