Balewagon Operation and Troubleshooting/Repair - Page 2 - Machinery - HayTalk - Hay & Forage Community - Page 2

Jump to content




Photo
- - - - -

Balewagon Operation and Troubleshooting/Repair


  • Please log in to reply
129 replies to this topic

#21 hay hauler

hay hauler

    Hay Master

  • Members
  • 435 posts
  • LocationCentral Oregon

Posted 26 February 2010 - 01:20 AM

I tend to leave poles up and around the stack till I take the hay away if they are not in the way..... I have had them fall a half of month later...:(. Also if the front stack is left lower this seems to help them not fall, maybe 4 or 5 tiers.

Our neighbor also just ties the fifth tier... with a cap. Easy to grapple but they do move around a lot over the winter.

#22 hay wilson in TX

hay wilson in TX

    Hay Master

  • Members
  • 1763 posts

Posted 26 February 2010 - 09:57 AM

I know there is resistance to using a bed of rocks for the floor of a barn, but I use a rock bed on the floor of my barn and taper the rocks do be lower at the center line of the stack. This way the stack leans in on it's center.

With my bermudagrass hay I use two tie tiers on the third and another on the fifth tier. Bermudagrass can and will move inside the wires and shift. Alfalfa stacks like so many bricks and stay put, (better). One tie tier will have the turned bales toward the front and the other toward the back of that stack. It may take some playing to get things right for the odd ball tie tier. Put two rows on the second table then manually lift the second table so these bales slide aft a few feet. Then finish the tie tier.
(My machine is the 1003 and only has one 12 bales on the second table not 15 so I have to get down and with just one row on the second table and move these bale far enough back so the flippers will be able to push the center bale back on the first table. I have not learned how to get those first three bales to move back with out rolling over.)

#23 hay hauler

hay hauler

    Hay Master

  • Members
  • 435 posts
  • LocationCentral Oregon

Posted 01 March 2010 - 12:37 PM

If your tie pins are mounted to the second table then this might work....

When sliding the first 3 back try putting 6 on first (let the first table run twice), set the pins then slide the first three back. This works for me... gets the first three sliding easier and smoother. You don’t need to send them far to make the tie work... about 1/2 or less on the second table...

Also the slicker the tables the better I find. I have even gone so far as to use an automotive wax on the 1st and 2nd table, along with a wire wheel to nock of all rust when we start in the spring. I try really hard not to let the tables get wet all season long. This tends to make them sticky....

#24 hay hauler

hay hauler

    Hay Master

  • Members
  • 435 posts
  • LocationCentral Oregon

Posted 01 March 2010 - 12:38 PM

Tips for picking up hay on hillsides...? Safty tricks?

#25 Rodney R

Rodney R

    Hay Master

  • Members
  • 959 posts
  • LocationHamburg, PA

Posted 01 March 2010 - 07:54 PM

I sorta laugh - many guys think that their balewagon operates poor on what I would call flat ground. About the only trick I have for hills is getting out. I may get out of the cab 3 times on a tie row. I can only dream of how well it would work if our fields were 'flat'. I think that bales pick better if they are on the uphill side of the wagon - the cross chain doesn't have to work so hard to push or grab them, but they might trip if they go too fast. Ours is computer controlled, and I sometimes fool it, cause I know it's going to make more work for me if I leave it do it's thing. Sometimes it's just easier to move the bales, then it is if it tries to move them. I have a love/hate relationship with the stackwagon, and sometimes it seems like it's trying to 'punish' me.....

I pick about 50-60k in a year, and the thing is in the shed every night - if it's in the rain, I am picking bales. You are right that rain makes things sticky.

When things get sticky at night (because of dew) use some cooking oil - the cheapest stuff you can find - some cheap generic cooking oil in a spray - like PAM - Spray 2 widths on the bale loader on each side, do a quick spray on the 1st table, and 3 widths on the 2nd table. The spray will only last one load, so no sense being too dilignet with the spray - you just want it sprayed where the bales slide. The oil helps the bales slide, and as the bales move, you can see where the spray has smeared. I carry a few cans with me all the time, and one can should last about 4 loads or so.

Rodney
  • hay hauler and Stoltzfus Hay Farm like this

#26 hay hauler

hay hauler

    Hay Master

  • Members
  • 435 posts
  • LocationCentral Oregon

Posted 01 March 2010 - 10:39 PM

Rodney R,

I never though of that…. Thanks! Any troubles with the dew molding the sides of the bales once they are in the stack?

I have heard stories of wagons braking springs on hillsides when the second table goes up…. So to deal with this…

I usually will run down a row and before the 2nd table trips I head down hill and change rows, allowing the table to cycle with the machine going straight or close to down hill, not side hilling. This seems to cause less were on the springs and pivot points of the table.

Also I am a bit worried about it rolling over so I try to only pick on a hill with 4 or less tiers on the load rack. Then finish in the bottom. The reason for this is one late night I had to get out and take a walk after my first experience of a steep hillside…:eek: Didn't brake anything but my heart was racing

I have considered stiffing up the spring pack with more leafs also to combat them braking…. Don’t know if this will work. I do know that something like a rear 1095 spring will work on my 1049. Thought about changing them both to that… It does seem to be a bit stiffer and looks stronger….

Edited by hay hauler, 01 March 2010 - 10:52 PM.


#27 Rodney R

Rodney R

    Hay Master

  • Members
  • 959 posts
  • LocationHamburg, PA

Posted 02 March 2010 - 07:43 PM

When the hills get reall steep I only have 3 tiers in the load rack, and one on the 2nd table. If the hill I am going down gets real bad, I just leave the 2nd table up, better than having to restack all the falling bales!

Never had a problem with mold from the dew - you have to remember that alfalfa has some sort of stuff in it that acts like glue, which is why you can make cubes out of it, and why JD had the in-the-field cubers years ago, and I think that is why the bales stick so much. Grass bales seem to be better under the same conditions, but if you run late enough you have to spray for them as well. If the hay was baled dry enough, and some acid was put on it, the small amount of moisture from dew is not going to affect the bales. Which goes back to what I always tell guys - the conditions AFTER hay is baled are nearly as important (if not more important) than the conditions when it was baled.

Rodney
  • hay hauler likes this

#28 nhbaler282

nhbaler282

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • 248 posts
  • LocationEast Texas

Posted 03 March 2010 - 10:46 PM

I use that grafite that you can get at tractor supply and put it on the chute,first table and the second table also put anti seize on under the load rack to make it slide easier this is a model 1033 with bermuda grass hay. Tell us some about tarping hay stacks like how do you get the tarp on top of the stack. I stacked some outside last summer and I attached a piece of light weight pipe to the tarp and took a u joint and made a handle to reach from the ground to roll and unroll the tarp,like they use on them hopper bottom trailers,but I didn't get it to roll up evenly but I am going to try again.

#29 hay hauler

hay hauler

    Hay Master

  • Members
  • 435 posts
  • LocationCentral Oregon

Posted 04 March 2010 - 12:19 PM

Usualy can walk up the back of the stack with the tarp if it is just free standing because of the way i make the first stack. If the front and back of the stack is virtical i just find a way to clime up it with the tarp via... ladder, bailwagon load rack, Just got to be carefull. Once on top i try to unfold the tarp and just start moving it out. If I leave the wagon dumped (Dont push off from the last stack) untill the stack is tarped the stack is a lot more stable to walk on. It really helps to have a second hand when doing this... Also i keep my phone in my pocket if i am alone. I figure if i were to fall off the top i would have a chance to get help....

Edited by hay hauler, 04 March 2010 - 12:21 PM.


#30 nwfarmer

nwfarmer

    Hay Master

  • Members
  • 244 posts

Posted 08 March 2010 - 09:47 AM

1033 stack wagon

I stair case the first bales in the stack to make a back stop. This way I don't need a permanent back stop and can move the stack year to year. I then run bale twine out from the edge of the stack 40 or 50 ft. and stake it into the ground. I can easily back along the line quickly. I also cut a length of pvc. When I have an extra person I back along the line until the back of the wagon reaches the length of pvc. Makes a perfect tight stack every time. My bales are 14 X 18 X 36 and weigh between 65 to 70 pounds. I have found it is easier to pick up and stack tight bales.

The small blocks on table 1 helps get the bales where you want them before they dump onto table 2 on sloped ground. Put the blocks on off or turn them around. What ever works. The blocks are sloped on one edge.

Speed does help in better pick up. I like to pick up at a little over 4 mph.
  • hay hauler likes this

#31 hay hauler

hay hauler

    Hay Master

  • Members
  • 435 posts
  • LocationCentral Oregon

Posted 10 March 2010 - 11:48 AM

Tire PSI on the Self Propelled wagons?

The 10 pounds from the max amout on them still seems soft to me....

Anyone running duals?

#32 hay wilson in TX

hay wilson in TX

    Hay Master

  • Members
  • 1763 posts

Posted 17 March 2010 - 08:24 AM

I have not seen any mention of the direction of travel for picking up the bales.

The bales slide better on the first table if picked up traveling the same direction as the baler was going. Has to do with the way the cut side rubs on the steel.
Something my wife showed me.

As for picking up hay soon after baling, I agree. I believe if the bales have started their sweat that makes the bales slide with more difficulty.
Picking up the next morning with dew on the bales also slows bales sliding along the first & second tables.
  • hay hauler likes this

#33 Rodney R

Rodney R

    Hay Master

  • Members
  • 959 posts
  • LocationHamburg, PA

Posted 18 March 2010 - 08:52 PM

Wilson is correct - picking bales the same direction that the baler traveled makes them pick MUCH better, it can be done the other way, it just works better like he said. I have also found the sooner you can get them after baleing the better - the longer they sit on the ground the more trouble they are to get up. Dew is a real problem. Once they sit overnight here, they almost pick up too much moisture to slide properly.

Duals.... I have heard of some folks running duals. The new ones come with super single truck tires on them. Worthless if your ground is not hard - we had NH switch ours to flotation tires like spray trucks have..... Much better than it was before!

Rodney
  • hay hauler likes this

#34 hay hauler

hay hauler

    Hay Master

  • Members
  • 435 posts
  • LocationCentral Oregon

Posted 04 April 2010 - 03:08 PM

Useful Internet sights?

Buy your next New Holland bale wagon from Guy and Ryan Palmer | Palmer Equipment Sales & Finding Service

Roeder Implement,

Sod Buster Sales Inc.- New Holland Used Bale Wagons

#35 rob_cook2001

rob_cook2001

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 89 posts

Posted 29 April 2010 - 11:25 PM

I have been custom stacking since 2004 with a 1069 diesel.
As for the expensive tires I put blemished(the printing on the sidewall was crooked) tires on the front. They can be had for 350-400 when you can find them.. For the rear there is a metric size that is common on trucks overseas. They are about 1/2 inch wider and 1/4 inch taller than the factory tires(close enough) and can be had for under 600 bucks. I learned to run this machine with no help and it sure was a pain in the butt. After I got done pulling my hair out and figured it out I love running these machines and will be investing in a 9870 next year.
Robert



#36 hay hauler

hay hauler

    Hay Master

  • Members
  • 435 posts
  • LocationCentral Oregon

Posted 01 May 2010 - 10:24 AM

Robert,

You have a company you buy your tires from?

#37 rob_cook2001

rob_cook2001

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 89 posts

Posted 01 May 2010 - 12:39 PM

Nebraska Tire - Quality discount tires and wheels for you! They are pretty good people to deal with. I need to call Monday and order a set of rear tires for my 1069.
  • hay hauler likes this

#38 NRC51

NRC51

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • 5 posts
  • LocationTexas

Posted 04 May 2010 - 09:38 AM

I've read through all these posts and while I have run both Accumulators and bale wagons, the bale wagon to me is the faster way to stack and unstack. Grass hay was always a nightmare because you never knew if a stack would still be standing when you came back with the next load. One night in winter I woke up and said I can't believe I never thought of that. This is what popped into my head.
I now take the twine that is used on big square bales( can be used stuff tied together) and when the second table is loaded I stop and wrap the twine once around the 15 bales and tie it off. I do this on 1,4,7 layers and no longer use the auto tie feature. I no longer have to worry about stacks falling over and the bottom layer never pulls out if the rack happens not to slide out easily.
It may take a few minutes longer when making a load but the rest is a real big relief and you'll love the straight stacks. Depending on the bales you can do more rows or put 2 strings on the #1 row if needed.
  • hay hauler likes this

#39 hay hauler

hay hauler

    Hay Master

  • Members
  • 435 posts
  • LocationCentral Oregon

Posted 05 May 2010 - 07:51 PM

NRC51,

How much twine do you use doing this in a year?

#40 rob_cook2001

rob_cook2001

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 89 posts

Posted 05 May 2010 - 09:28 PM

I have seen a guy that does that with grass hay, I don't have much of a problem with stacks falling over so I never tried it but it seams to work with him. He also has a problem of forgetting to use his push off feet. Just puts it in gear and dumps the whole load. When he does it he goes off the deep end, throwing his hat and stomping the ground HAHAH. I have seen him do it 3 times in one day.
Robert




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

× Sponsors