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Balewagon Operation and Troubleshooting/Repair


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#1 hay hauler

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Posted 16 February 2010 - 11:28 PM

Please:

Add all any and all information you can to this thread and expand on anything you think needs expanding. Maybe even add information from other threads. What might seem obvious to some may not to others.

Let’s try and KEEP CHIT CHAT TO A MINIMUM in this thread so that the information will be quick and easy for all to find.

Let's load this up with information!

Thanks!


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#2 hay hauler

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Posted 19 February 2010 - 02:06 AM

What to look at when buying.

Good to have

*Auto tie to commence and complete the tie process without getting off the tractor
*Hydraulic chute control to raise and lower the pick up chute
*Push off feet condition (Extend with out hooking other parts)

Efficiency

*The width of your hay shelter
*The space your yard/building configuration
*Typical load size needed/wanted
*If you want the ability to unload one bale at a time to feed an elevator or stacking crew
* The height needed to dump height of the load rack.
* The size of your tractor relative to the load capacity of the picker (Hp and Weight).

In your check of the unit look at

Under power
*The hydraulic system, pump, hoses, the function of the tables the dump and the push off feet
*The drive shaft
*Drive chains
*Bale mover chains/ Sprockets

*Tires
*Hubs
*Pick up chute damage
*Table bumpers (rubber stand offs that the tables fall on when returned to resting position, they make rub marks on the resting point if the ware area has moved around the bushings holding the table need checking)
*Pivot points and connecting arms for the tables to ensure they have not been twisted, are askew, or worn out.
*Condition of sheet metal on the second table (you can tell a lot about the how a machine was taken care of you how the sheet metal on the tables ripples = lots of use)
*Pumps for these can cost some money (leaking= on their last leg)
*For those not mechanically inclined these machines are not a place to save money.
*Condition of the uprights

Self-propelled

*Engine condition
*Transmission condition
*Kingpins on axels
*Brakes
*Rear axel and two speed
*Cab and glass condition
*Pump drive pulley and chain
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#3 hay hauler

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Posted 19 February 2010 - 02:10 AM

Pre start

• Air filter
• Oil level
• Coolant level
• Brake Fluid
• Distributor cap (Clean)
• Clean glass
• Tire pressure
• Springs
• Grease
• Belts
• Check pick chute chain tightness
• Clean from all chafe (Loose Hay)
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#4 hay hauler

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Posted 19 February 2010 - 02:14 AM

Field Check

• If someone has farmed it before then ask advise for obstacles (they usually know or have hit them)
• Power lines
• Irrigation
• Septic fields
• Rocks
• Wet areas
• Pivot Tracks (Closer to the center is usually deeper)

If you only travel where the field was cut and stay out of standing grass we reduce the risk to hit unwanted obsticals with the pick up chute or other parts of the machine.

Swinging the pickup chute into tall grass can be a gamble.

Edited by hay hauler, 19 February 2010 - 01:10 PM.

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#5 hay hauler

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Posted 19 February 2010 - 02:27 AM

Stacking

• Free of large rocks
• Area to push off to
• Level area with enough room to move the stack out
• Bracing inside the barn on the wall
• The machine will raise up some once unloaded plain for this
• One row of bales against the wall can help create proper “lean”
• Flake of hay can level an area.
• Making stacks lean into each other will help them stand for a long time
• Steady dumping rate
• Push off feet in all they way prior to raising load rack!
• Square to each stack
• Stack poles for security in front or to the side. (picture)
• Stacks will settle after a week or so (Short stacks in front or leave stack poles for a period of time)
• Watch that push off feed don’t hook strings in the stack
• In the field something to dump against of “stacking stack” (picture)
• Cap tier for tarping (tie tire on top with our side bales)• Guides on the floors or rafters can aid in backing up
• Telephone poles in the ground work well to create back stops
• Start into the barn at a angle to see where you are going if possible (backing all the way down a wall can be difficult
• Easier to start on the wall of a barn that is the easiest to see (SP start on the right side looking at the barn opening)

Edited by hay hauler, 19 February 2010 - 12:55 PM.

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#6 hay hauler

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Posted 19 February 2010 - 12:51 PM

Self-propelled vs. pull type

SP
• 300+ ton per year
• Efficient to about 7 miles of hauling
• Easier to operate and easier on the back and neck
• One more machine (drive train) to maintain
• Helpless in soft ground

Pull type
• Efficient up to 300 ton per year
• Constantly looking back to operate
• More difficult to back into the barn
• Simpler to maintain
• Less costly
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#7 hay hauler

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Posted 19 February 2010 - 01:00 PM

More stacking tips

Once the wagon is pushed off the stack a foot or two make verify the load rack is all they way leaned back like in the picture or the ends of the load rack can pull the bottom bales out from under the stack.

The tips of the load rack shoud sill be on the ground once out from the stack.
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#8 hay hauler

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Posted 19 February 2010 - 01:07 PM

Speed tricks

When in the field a bail can be held in the position shown and a second bale can be pushed along the ground allowing the first or second table to cycle. This allows the machine to continue at a constant rate with out stopping.

Just don’t hold the bale so high that it falls under the first table as it cycles.

By doing this for example from the time the second table cycles on a three wide we can move down the field four bales by holding two on the first table, and two with the pick up chute.
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#9 hay hauler

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Posted 21 February 2010 - 01:01 AM

Bales

The length of the bale is very important!

I find 36” 16X18 bales at 75 to 80 pounds is the best size for a 3 wide....

The more consistent the hay is feed into the bailer the better.

We want the hay to go into the uprights of the balewagon and just squeeze into the uprights with a small amount of pressure.

To long and it can be really hard on the sheet metal and pins holding the second table and even brake bale strings.
To short and they can shift left and right while stacking in the field causing the stack to lean when standing.

The way the hay looks in the picture is what I have fount to be almost optimal the bales might be just a inch to long.

With this in mind it is better to error on the side of short. To shot can be worked with.... their is a point where to long just wont work.

Extra long "oops" bales can be put on the top in a form of a cap tier though....

The faster they are picked after bailed the easier they will slide. After 24 hours of the bales hitting the ground they tend to become “sticky”.

Edited by hay hauler, 21 February 2010 - 01:04 AM.

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#10 hay hauler

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Posted 21 February 2010 - 01:05 AM

Anyone thing of other things to add?

Questions?

Speed Trick?

#11 expensive hobby

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Posted 21 February 2010 - 03:57 PM

had to buy a tire 600 bucks anybody try skidsteer tires?

#12 hay hauler

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Posted 21 February 2010 - 08:22 PM

The rears for mine are 1,100 each...:(. Looking for other ideas as well....?

#13 hay hauler

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Posted 23 February 2010 - 11:23 PM

Tie tiers.

What way to do make the most stable stack?

3 wide wagon, 9 tiers high

4th and 7th tie I tie the front of the stack (Once standing the side that faces the front of the barn). And on the 5th I tie one row of bales in from the front of the stack. Also a cap tier on the top.

Edited by hay hauler, 23 February 2010 - 11:57 PM.


#14 expensive hobby

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Posted 23 February 2010 - 11:54 PM

im suprised that you cap ties, with rail bales its never an issue of piles splitting side ways

#15 hay hauler

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Posted 24 February 2010 - 12:01 AM

It seems to work well when we tarp the hay out side, also since i dont tie the back of the stack it seems to help those bales not want to fall out the side... If it isnt square to the stack before i find them to be unstable...

And for some reason the bottom of the bales will sometimes be a half of foot inside of the top bales if the makes since.....:confused: been working hard to figure this out. It may be from the stack shifting when i am making turns to fast at the end of the field.... I have a issue of going to fast late at night....:rolleyes:

#16 ButchAutomatic

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Posted 24 February 2010 - 06:22 AM

Hay Hauler, Are you making 16x18 bales? I am making 14x16 bales and do the tier ties on 4th and 7th siminular to yours above, but we have 18 bales on tier and 17 bales on our tier ties and sometimes have the fronts blow out on softer hay.

#17 hay hauler

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Posted 24 February 2010 - 12:00 PM

I custom stack both but the most common is the 16X18. I have had issues with that if I have too much lean on the stack, or to big of distance in-between stacks when I dump. It seems at as the hay pile grows a person can always increase the lean on the next block of hay but you can never take it away.

My stacks never lean back as much as the bale wagon load rack will tip. I find that if this happens it will actual push the bottom of the stack out forward.
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#18 expensive hobby

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Posted 24 February 2010 - 10:51 PM

i had that problem also so instead of 2 rows of 6 i have 2 rails with 5 sets of 2 inbetween then just i row of 3

#19 hay hauler

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Posted 24 February 2010 - 11:45 PM

What tier do you do this in? And how many ties in a stack?

#20 Rodney R

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Posted 25 February 2010 - 06:58 PM

Everything gets stacked on pallets here (I have a picture here on this board somewhere of the pallet - PM me, and I will send you some.) And we also have enough room in the shed, and enough lift on the grabber that we add the 10th row to the stacks. I had trouble with the stacks blowing out, so now I tie 3, 5, 7. Seems all I do is make tie rows. I have nearly 0 problems. Neighbor only has 1 tie, and his stacks look alright as well - I'm betting that the extra row puts a lot of stress on the stack. I would bet that blowing out the front might be that the stack leans too much? But that's just an idea from afar. Seems that the stacks always look nicer in brochures? And the crappy ones are always in the front, and they either fall just before you go to move them, or they fall at some inoportune time...... either way, it is much more fun to pick bales out of the field, than to pick up a fallen stack!

Rodney




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