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Featured Product: Hay Moisture Tester - HT-PRO™...

Nov 11 2013 05:57 PM | puritanize in Articles

Featured Product: Hay Moisture Tester - HT-PRO™ Portable

The HT-PRO™ Portable Hay Moisture Tester with Calibration Clip comes in 2 sizes:
  • 20 inch Probe - Part No. 07120
  • 10 inch Probe - Part No. 07121
http://www.balesuppl...alibration-clip

What are the Key Features:
  • This originally was the first and only hay moisture tester to include a calibration clip that was portable.
  • Has a 10 inch and 20 inch probe length option.
  • Above and below moisture limit indicator
  • Backlit LED display for operation in low light situations.

The Specifications:
  • Moisture range is: 8% to 45% depending on the type of hay tested
  • Temperature range: 32° to 225°F (0° to 107°C)
  • Accurate throughout the normal range of stored, baled alfalfa, timothy and clover hay
  • Display resolution: 0.1% moisture
  • 9V battery is required

Possible Accessories:
  • HT-PRO™ Calibration Clip - Part No. 07156

http://www.balesupply.com/

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Do you have your Pasture, Range and Forage Insu...

Oct 14 2013 03:16 PM | puritanize in Articles

Do you have your Pasture, Range and Forage Insurance? Insurance like this is setup not only for hay farmers but livestock owners as well if they were to have losses on the property.

When is the deadline? November 15, 2013 for the 2014 year.

“Insurance is a critical component in producers’ risk management portfolios during periods of drought or uncertainty,” she said. “This policy benefited many cattle producers around the Panhandle in 2011 and 2012 due to the low rainfall conditions.”
You can have between 70 and 90 percent of your property covered.

The standard value is a rate determined by the Risk Management Agency for each and every county. Texas uses the rainfall index to help them decide the insurance coverage (rain data comes from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Climate Prediction Center data).

You can check out the tool here. http://agforceusa.com/rma/ri/prf/dst.

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GMO Hay Mixed and Not Labeled

Sep 15 2013 04:46 PM | puritanize in Articles

Looks like a state ag lab found that some seed from some farm in Eastern Washington had a mix of some genetically modified hay but claim it was really low and no big deal.

According to Mark Anderson, the president/CEO of the Anderson Hay and Grain of Ellensburg, our government has approved that Round Up Ready alfalfa can be sold but also says that nobody really wants it.

So what's the big deal? The big deal here is making sure that everyone knows exactly what they are paying for. Not everyone is OK with the GMO product. If you're paying for one thing and getting another possibly mixed in, you should know.

“The WSDA testing has indicated a low-level presence of a Round-Up Ready genetic trait in the seed, well within ranges acceptable to much of the marketplace,” a news release from the department said late Friday. “This information has been shared with the farmer.”

Of course some say this is no big deal and the WSDA still claims many want the Round Up Ready alfalfa although the market shows something completely different.

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Historic Agricultural Data Is Ready Now Online

Aug 14 2013 10:25 PM | puritanize in Articles

In early July, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) simplified access to historic data by putting 77 years’ worth of agricultural statistics online. In the past, this information, published in the annual bulletin Agricultural Statistics, was available in print form only.

The volumes are now available at www.nass.usda.gov/Publications/Ag_Statistics/index.asp
“U.S. agriculture continues to progress by learning from our past, which is why it is imperative to have historic data easily available,” said Dr. Cynthia Clark, NASS Administrator. “By publishing this information online we are simplifying the research process and further enhancing access to this important and interesting information.”

NASS and its predecessors at USDA have published Agricultural Statistics since 1936. The bulletins are a compilation of data produced by multiple agencies within USDA. Each volume is a one-stop location for annual production, consumption, trade, and price data for all sorts of crops and livestock, as well as farm economics, spending for government programs, and lots of other statistics important to our country’s agricultural system. These volumes detail U.S. farming for much of the 20th century, including the Dust Bowl and World War II.

While digitizing these past data, NASS statisticians uncovered some fascinating historical facts, including:

U.S. egg exports skyrocketed from 5 million dozen in 1940 to 153 million dozen in 1941, the same year the Lend-Lease policy was enacted to provide food aid to Britain and other allies during World War II. By 1944, that number was nearly 700 million dozen.
In 1933, hybrid corn seeds made up only one-tenth of 1 percent of the national crop. Within ten years, that proportion reached 50 percent, and by 1956, more than 90 percent of the national corn crop was from hybrid seeds.
Iowa harvested 2.36 billion bushels of corn in 2011, more than the entire U.S. corn harvest of 1935.
Once staples of American farms, horse and mule populations fell from 18.7 million in 1930 to 3.1 million in 1960, after which the statistic was discontinued.

“Whether you need them for research or are just curious about our country’s farming history, these historic volumes are a valuable addition to the official statistical literature available to the public,” added Clark.

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Maize Baler School; Feb/March Dates

Feb 19 2013 01:14 PM | downtownjr in Articles

Baler School...Friday 22 February 22 and Saturday 23 February at the Maize Corporation's facility in Maize, Kansas. In addition, the New Mexico school is scheduled for Wednesday 6 March in Artesia, New Mexico. Contact Maize at 316-722-8710 to register.

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Evaluating Hay and Pasture Stands

Feb 01 2013 11:03 AM | ForageSeeds.com in Articles

By Dennis Brown, Originally - FORAGESEEDS.COM

The fluctuation of the wet spring to the severe drought in the fall and now a long cold winter may result in poor hay and pasture stands in the spring. Plants may be killed or weakened, leaving barren areas in the fields or thinning of the stand from last fall, depending on the severity of the drought and harvest management last fall.

Accurate assessment of forage stands for winter injury is an important and economically sound management practice. The degree of injury will vary depending on a number of climatic and cultural factors listed below...

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Testing the Moisture Content of Hay: Accurately...

Jan 14 2013 08:39 PM | downtownjr in Articles

Testing the moisture content of hay prior to the baling process is essential to both seller and buyer. Moisture in hay is considered in three different forms, free water, physically trapped water, and bound water. The free and physically trapped water can be evaporated given proper conditions which include solar radiation, relative humidity, and time.

At the time of baling the ideal moisture level is between 18 and 22 percent. Hay baled with higher moisture percentages can foster mold, resulting in loss, and in severe cases, damage as the accompanying heat can cause spontaneous combustion. Due to its importance, testing hay for moisture content is essential to the success for both the buyer and seller.

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Reducing Drying Time of Hay and Hay Silage In t...

Jun 26 2012 11:50 AM | UpNorth in Articles

Harvesting high quality hay and hay silage has been a challenge in a number of hay growing regions because of the unpredictability of rainfall. Rain falling on hay that’s laying down in the field causes a number of problems. Soluble nutrients are lost, reducing feeding value and fermentation potential. Wet hay may also spontaneously combust. When properly dried forages should be ensiled at 65% moisture and bailed at 14-18% moisture (large-small bales). A number practices can reduce the amount of time that forages lie in the field.

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