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How to rake after haybine swathing


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#1 fastline

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Posted 13 June 2013 - 01:26 AM

The obvious paths for a haybine on a square property is pretty much cutting in a spiral.  However, when raking, it is my understanding that V rakes don't do well in the corners so keep them running straight. 

 

I am curious how you guys mow and rake typically with a haybine?



#2 blainalbin

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Posted 13 June 2013 - 05:51 AM

I'm fairly new to the hay business so I'm still learning the best way to attack cutting and raking.  I have small, odd shaped fields so I always do the spiral.  Some neighbours of mine who have bigger fields and making small squares will do 3 or 4 rounds around the outside.  Then rake and bale that.  Then the interior part they will cut in straight rows.  Their fields are big enough that those first 3 or 4 rows amounts to enough for them to do that. My fields are so small that I want to cut the whole thing in one shot.  I'm also making round bales which is quicker than making small squares.

 

I find raking to have been the trickiest art.  I have a small rotary rake that you have to raise and lower by hand.  I seem to try to rake the hay into straight rows instead of the spiral.  Straight rows seem to be easier for me to bale with my round baler.  I will usually rake 2 windrows into one unless there's a lot of hay.



#3 JD3430

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Posted 13 June 2013 - 06:25 AM

I'm right there with you. When I cut or rake, I'm always thinking "will my tractor and baler be able to make this turn without trouble?"
I usually make a racetrack around the outside, then shoot for long lines inside since once the headlands are baled up, there's room to turn around.

#4 fastline

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Posted 13 June 2013 - 09:16 AM

To get nice straights, I would need to constantly swing the haybine right to left and get all lined up again.  I would think it would be a big time waster but maybe you can make that up with smooth raking and baling?



#5 hay wilson in TX

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Posted 13 June 2013 - 10:25 AM

Here is some poor advise. 

 

The usual is to mow as you say then rake making reasonably good corners, then raking out the mess on the corners.  This results in too much dead heading but that is the way we always did it.

 

If your swather can lay the hay out flat and wide then you can rake to the end, reverse your travel and rake the full length of the field only. 

 

Better yet if your fields are such that you can run a long length and a short cross section. 

 

Figuring the cost per hour to run each piece of equipment, the abler is the highest cost per hour.  Save time here save money.

Next is the mower conditioner.  Some mower conditionesr can turn and cut back next to the opening swath, but many are not that fortunate.

The least cost per hour to run but the most crucial for good bales is the rake. 

 

Most of my hay fields are 138 feet wide, and are long. 

 

 



#6 Will 400m

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Posted 13 June 2013 - 11:18 AM

Mowing I do circles and most of my fields are realy weird shapes so that works. And I know alot of people have trouble with haybines and point rows but I never had any issues dont know why but I dont. I tedd everything so as long as it gets cut I dont have to go the same way to rake. I do the outside lap doubled up and then a lap or two then strate lines as best as I can.



#7 mlappin

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Posted 13 June 2013 - 02:07 PM

Best way to avoid dealing with corners and the resulting mess in the corners is to not make any more corners than absolutely required, in other words don't mow in a freakin circle.

Mowing in a circle came about from the old sickle bar mowers that had a manual lift and unless you folded the bar up for transport may or may not lift high enough to get over the cut hay. 

You don't plow, disc, plant corn, side dress or cultivate in a circle in a 20 acre field


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#8 Josh in WNY

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Posted 13 June 2013 - 04:01 PM

On big fields I will mow 5 or 6 laps (with our 9 foot cut disc mower/conditioner) and maybe split the field in half by taking a few straight runs up and down the middle.  This is usually enough hay for me to want to do in a day.  Once the field is opened up, it is straight lines all the way.  On smaller fields (5 acres or less), I will do pretty much the same thing, but will mow it all at once.  This means I'm driving on the mowed hay in the headlands, but that usually hasn't caused a problem.

 

I run two NH rollerbar rakes rather than a V-rake, but since they are hooked in tandem, corners are still a pain.



#9 mlappin

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Posted 13 June 2013 - 07:03 PM

 

 

I run two NH rollerbar rakes rather than a V-rake, but since they are hooked in tandem, corners are still a pain.

I hear yah there, had a pair as well with the hitch, on small fields that were ten acres or less I'd only take one rake as the tandem was too much of a PITA for that small a field.



#10 JD3430

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Posted 13 June 2013 - 07:23 PM

I have also noticed that on like a 20 acre field, a guy will mow ~5 laps then cut a few long straight passes down the middle and then bale it. I guess that's a good way to stop from mushing headlands into the ground.
Once I get in a field, I'm cutting the whole thing.

#11 urednecku

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Posted 13 June 2013 - 09:05 PM

I'll make the first 5 or 6 passes mowing around the outside, then thru the middle. Yea, turning on the first cut, outside rows. When I come back with the tedder, and rake, I'll start with the straight rows, again turning on the headlands, then tedd or rake the outside last. Then bale the outside first.


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#12 traden86

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Posted 13 June 2013 - 09:15 PM

6 swaths along the outside perimeter of the field no matter the shape or size, and then it's long straight rows whenever I can. We only have grass hay around here so I'm not worried about turning on the headlands.
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#13 mlappin

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Posted 13 June 2013 - 09:49 PM

I have also noticed that on like a 20 acre field, a guy will mow ~5 laps then cut a few long straight passes down the middle and then bale it. I guess that's a good way to stop from mushing headlands into the ground.
Once I get in a field, I'm cutting the whole thing.

When I was still messing around with the rolabar rakes if another field was close enough I'd mow one then go take just the outside rounds of the next. Then finish mowing the second field after I'd get the outside rounds off as we had the older non hydraulic twin hitch and it took a lot of room to get it turned around. Could rake a lot of hay with it in an afternoon, not near as much as my vrake now but much better than using a single rake.


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#14 fastline

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Posted 13 June 2013 - 11:08 PM

I am quickly learning to hate the pull behind hydroswing.   I have about 3hrs on it now and just too many negatives like sore neck, harder to create ideal baler passes, tires on the outside so hard to mow edge of ditches, etc. 

 

So again, 5-6 passes on perimeter, then straight passes BUT is that with a hydroswing?  I have to pick up, swing all thee way over to the other side and dial in, etc.  On EVERY pass! 

 

Is it possible to rake across windrows?  So if I cut in a spiral then drag the hay into straight rows after?  I know some don't recommend driving on the windrow but I may not have too much choice here. 



#15 JD3430

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Posted 14 June 2013 - 07:21 AM

I am quickly learning to hate the pull behind hydroswing.   I have about 3hrs on it now and just too many negatives like sore neck, harder to create ideal baler passes, tires on the outside so hard to mow edge of ditches, etc. 
 
So again, 5-6 passes on perimeter, then straight passes BUT is that with a hydroswing?  I have to pick up, swing all thee way over to the other side and dial in, etc.  On EVERY pass! 
 
Is it possible to rake across windrows?  So if I cut in a spiral then drag the hay into straight rows after?  I know some don't recommend driving on the windrow but I may not have too much choice here.


Sometimes I have to do that. I'm sure a lot of hay farmers have fields surrounded by trees like me. The trees create a lot of shade and so my outer rings I cut first always give me trouble.
What I do sometimes is cut and rake the whole field then bale the middle. Then I take the outer rings and rake them away from the trees towards the center, which is now just clean stubble. This allows the outer rings to get a chance to dry. They never seem to dry near the trees. I have limbed them back as much as the owners will allow.
I have more than my share of "foggy bottom" type fields, near rivers, surrounded by trees.

#16 mlappin

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Posted 14 June 2013 - 07:33 AM

I am quickly learning to hate the pull behind hydroswing.   I have about 3hrs on it now and just too many negatives like sore neck, harder to create ideal baler passes, tires on the outside so hard to mow edge of ditches, etc. 

 

So again, 5-6 passes on perimeter, then straight passes BUT is that with a hydroswing?  I have to pick up, swing all thee way over to the other side and dial in, etc.  On EVERY pass! 

 

Is it possible to rake across windrows?  So if I cut in a spiral then drag the hay into straight rows after?  I know some don't recommend driving on the windrow but I may not have too much choice here. 

You'll get used to it, most everybody I know once using a center pivot mower would never go back to a side pull.

 

 

Sometimes I have to do that. I'm sure a lot of hay farmers have fields surrounded by trees like me. The trees create a lot of shade and so my outer rings I cut first always give me trouble.
What I do sometimes is cut and rake the whole field then bale the middle. Then I take the outer rings and rake them away from the trees towards the center, which is now just clean stubble. This allows the outer rings to get a chance to dry. They never seem to dry near the trees. I have limbed them back as much as the owners will allow.
I have more than my share of "foggy bottom" type fields, near rivers, surrounded by trees.

I had a few like that as well, if the weather allowed I'd rake it out of the shade and let it dry more, if not I'd bale and back up to the tree line then dump those bales and get em fed up to the cows asap.


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#17 JD3430

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Posted 14 June 2013 - 07:47 AM

 
 


I had a few like that as well, if the weather allowed I'd rake it out of the shade and let it dry more, if not I'd bale and back up to the tree line then dump those bales and get em fed up to the cows asap.


Now I just need some cattle to feed em too!!!
My wife would kill me. Lol

#18 fastline

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Posted 14 June 2013 - 09:06 AM

Let me ask, I am having two issues. 

 

1.  Cut is uneven.  I am not dropping to the ground and riding on the skids.  I drop, then pickup a touch.  Do I just need to leave it on the ground? 

 

2.  It plugged up twice on me.  I was trying to cut at sundown and other was dark.  I also noticed the drive belt is not super tight and heard it MUST be super tight? 

 

Other than that, it is running pretty darn well.



#19 JD3430

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Posted 14 June 2013 - 09:10 AM

Let me ask, I am having two issues.

1. Cut is uneven. I am not dropping to the ground and riding on the skids. I drop, then pickup a touch. Do I just need to leave it on the ground?

2. It plugged up twice on me. I was trying to cut at sundown and other was dark. I also noticed the drive belt is not super tight and heard it MUST be super tight?

Other than that, it is running pretty darn well.

I let mine ride across ground in a "float" position. Might be hard on hydraulic system to have it up slightly.
Plugging a haybine at the time of day you're cutting is normal. You have dew on the grass. Once it gets wet and sticky, she'll plug. Mine does. I cut at night once and pugged the machine more times than I'd like to have.

#20 fastline

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Posted 14 June 2013 - 09:40 AM

We watched specifically for dew and nothing really felt wet or transferred to the tires.  I am not sure if it would still get "tougher" with the sun down though.  If that is the case, I should be able to put the hammer down today. 






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