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Broomsedge in a few acres of my OG Hayfields


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10 replies to this topic

#1 whitmerlegacyfarm

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Posted 31 December 2012 - 10:26 PM

What can i spray on some of my hayfields in the spring to kill of the Broomsedge, i just finally was able to identify it. I have a ton of this in a small 2 ac field and it makes a mess when i go to rake and bale. It's turns real brown and then seed heads fly everywhere and look like feathers flying threw the air. I'm assuming 2-4D is no good cause sprayed that this past summer. Im hoping i can get an all around good spray, that i can put on all my Orchard grass fields.

Thanks all

#2 ANewman

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Posted 31 December 2012 - 11:03 PM

What you are describing sounds like what we call sage grass here. It is usually an indicator that you need lime. Is it present on your first cutting or more noticeable only in the fall?
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#3 Vol

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Posted 01 January 2013 - 05:52 AM

What can i spray on some of my hayfields in the spring to kill of the Broomsedge, i just finally was able to identify it. I have a ton of this in a small 2 ac field and it makes a mess when i go to rake and bale. It's turns real brown and then seed heads fly everywhere and look like feathers flying threw the air. I'm assuming 2-4D is no good cause sprayed that this past summer. Im hoping i can get an all around good spray, that i can put on all my Orchard grass fields.

Thanks all


Whitmer, there is no selective herbicide that you can kill sedge with.....glyphosate does kill it. Either kill out that section of the field and re-plant or heavily fertilize that area for 4-5 years and your other grasses will out-compete sedge and it will slowly disappear. You will need to cut the broomsedge area a few weeks earlier than you have been doing so as not to disperse the seed flyers.

Regards, Mike
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#4 whitmerlegacyfarm

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Posted 01 January 2013 - 07:49 AM

Yep, it mainly shows up after my 1st cutting. I did lime everything this fall 2 ton to the acre per my soil sample. The stuff defently shoots up quick especially on my 3rd cut it was everywhere.

Is it bad for animal/horses to eat? My horses dont really touch a bale with that stuff in so my assumption is its not good for them haha.

#5 Vol

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Posted 01 January 2013 - 08:14 AM

Yep, it mainly shows up after my 1st cutting. I did lime everything this fall 2 ton to the acre per my soil sample. The stuff defently shoots up quick especially on my 3rd cut it was everywhere.

Is it bad for animal/horses to eat? My horses dont really touch a bale with that stuff in so my assumption is its not good for them haha.


Sedge is a warm season grass so it does not emerge until summer....it will not hurt your horses as far as I know...but is not very palatable if it is not cut in its early stages of growth....

Regards, Mike

#6 dubltrubl

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Posted 01 January 2013 - 08:24 AM

+1 what Mike says. I have yet to find anything that wil eradicate broomsedge. Extension agent tells me it's an indication of poor fertility and PH. I think that's partially true, but not totally because I know our fertility and liming is more than adequate. I think it's mostly opportunistic during periods of poor management. I know our fields were poorly managed by previous operators. We are seeing the broomsedge slowly being crowded out by good stuff. Keep it as short as possible and give the good stuff a chance to compete will help a lot. It actually makes good hay if you can cut it while it's tender. Let it get tall and brown and everything I've seen will turn it's nose up at it.
Regards,
Steve
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#7 FarmerCline

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Posted 01 January 2013 - 12:47 PM

Vol and dubltrubl hit the the nail right on the head. If you have a lot of it in the field I would seriously consider plowing the ground as soon as possible in order to incorporate the lime you applied and disc and replant in the spring. By turning the broomsage under it should kill it by spring. You could also wait and spray roundup after it greens up in the spring to kill it and then no till the field. If you just have scattered clumps of it in the field a good lime and fertilize program will get rid of it after a number of years.

#8 RockmartGA

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Posted 01 January 2013 - 11:15 PM

As others have noted, PH and fertilizer are important, but I think the key is to keep the broomsedge cut down and not let it mature and go to seed. Which is why you seldom see it in a pasture that is actively grazed.

One thing that I have tried (with varying success) is to wick it with roundup early in its growth cycle.

#9 whitmerlegacyfarm

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Posted 06 January 2013 - 08:08 PM

I'm considering spraying with round up in the spring, or maybe i will just plow this small field up and put a big patch of sweet corn in then reseed in the fall. Lol im just not wanting to loose that little bit of hay but i did pick up 2 ac. that i no tilled OG in so i guess it's part of it and this way i can better my stands, and maybe have a chance of getting some sweet corn for once, dang deer hit it all the last few years.

#10 Grazer

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Posted 24 March 2013 - 09:59 AM

I just burned a 12@ field of broom sedge that was aprox. waist high and now has aprox. 2inches of rain fallen. The other grasses in this field had been choked out. I have some weeds; 5-8 Multi-flora Rose plants, some Honeysuckle infringement from perimeter, Thistle, Purple top. I know poor management by me. This pasture had been being used for cattle and horse grazing. I had been devoting my management to the 20acres of Hybrid Bermuda grass I bale on.

What would be your first step in revitalizing this field? Disk? Lime? Herbicide? If Herbicide, with what and what stage?

I put up aprox. 1500 small square bales of Hybrid Bermuda grass hay and aprox. 2000 mixed grass hay. Mixed grass=Bahia, common bermuda and some non-noxious weeds.

#11 Vol

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Posted 24 March 2013 - 04:44 PM

I just burned a 12@ field of broom sedge that was aprox. waist high and now has aprox. 2inches of rain fallen. The other grasses in this field had been choked out. I have some weeds; 5-8 Multi-flora Rose plants, some Honeysuckle infringement from perimeter, Thistle, Purple top. I know poor management by me. This pasture had been being used for cattle and horse grazing. I had been devoting my management to the 20acres of Hybrid Bermuda grass I bale on.

What would be your first step in revitalizing this field? Disk? Lime? Herbicide? If Herbicide, with what and what stage?

I put up aprox. 1500 small square bales of Hybrid Bermuda grass hay and aprox. 2000 mixed grass hay. Mixed grass=Bahia, common bermuda and some non-noxious weeds.


You probably will have more grass this spring than you think. Spray 2 pints/ac. 2-4d now....spot spray rose with brush killer now....cut and bale grass during normal time....soon after first cutting is removed the sedge(sage) grass will start growing vigorously. When sedge is up about 6 inches tall spray with 4 pints/ac. of glyphosate or more if other hard to kill undersirables are also growing and use plenty of surfactant. Sow this fall in grass of your choice or sprig this summer with bermuda.

Regards, Mike
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