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ADF in Coastal


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6 replies to this topic

#1 eberlej

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Posted 25 August 2012 - 06:13 AM

Can anyone tell me what effects the ADF level in Coastal hay and how to lower it? I entered my first hay show at the local fair and although I received a blue ribbon, I didn't place in the top 5. I noticed on the certificates that they referenced two numbers, the CP of which mine was approxmately 14.6% and my ADF was around 31% if I remember correctly. Some competitors had a lower CP but also had a lower ADF.

Searching this forum, I cannot find any discussions on how to manage the ADF levels and would appreciate some input.

#2 fredro

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Posted 25 August 2012 - 10:19 AM

cp is a nitrogen test therefore application date and cut date should be studied closely adf is fiber that cant be utilized more stem high adf less stem less adf takes lots of management time

#3 eberlej

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Posted 25 August 2012 - 11:02 AM

so, going with a shorter cut interval should reduce ADF?

#4 fredro

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Posted 25 August 2012 - 11:38 AM

yes i cut sumrall 007 every 20 days apply 30 lbs n 20 p 60 k had test high as 24%cp adf20 or less

#5 hay wilson in TX

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Posted 25 August 2012 - 03:02 PM

Georgia has a good publication regarding bermudagrass, ( much of this information could also apply to other grass hay. )
http://pubsadmin.cae...pdf/B 911_2.PDF

On page 9 Figure 1 has an excellent chart that should help. That is the start, your harvesting management is also a major contributing factor. +
aolemb://FBA20557-5352-40A9-BB6C-4B9F813091C9/Untitled.jpg

Their chart tells us that harvesting at 18 day interval will result in 18% CP.
You will need the fertilizer to support a ton of hay at > 18% CP . i.e. at least 60 lbs of nitrogen.
If you believe TAMU 120 lbs would do wonders.
The other elements also must be in balance, in the crop.

So if you have enough fertilizer for rapid growth to produce ¾ ton of hay.

We are talking about compition hay not production hay.
You will have to, (Must) manage your harvesting to retain the maximum amount of leaves. It is in the leave that the good ( Low ) ADF & NDF are found. Bale that windrow as close as you can at 70% Relative humidity for a moisture level in the 18% to 20% range.

You want to rake this hay at as close to 90% relative humidity, to preserve leaves. Do this for both production as well as compition hay.

Cut the hay with a conditioner machine set to lay the hay out so wide that you have only a faint hint of where one pass is next to the other. This is also for both compition and production, and assuming you are in the humid east not the arid west.

You want a cloudless day of hot sunshine, This is to get the hay down to an average 47% moisture by sunset. This will stop respiration and loss of feed value. Now if you are in the Arid West you do not NEED the wide swath of hay, your 10% RH and 15 mph of wind will do just fine thank you.

What you want is stems that are down in the 10% moisture range and the leaves to be up close to 30% moisture at baling.
Your hay bale will be as soft as a feather bed. You will have more than 50% leaf possibly 60% leaf, and ideal is 70% leaf. ( Something you can never do with alfalfa. )

I cut at a 42 day interval and have difficulty holding the CP down to 12%. The most protein a customer will pay good money for is 12% CP grass hay, HERE, in CenTex.


Sorry this format will not support the copy and paste of the chart, you will have to look it up.

While you are at read STUDY the West Virginia information http://www.wvu.edu/~...r/TRIM/5811.pdf .
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#6 eberlej

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Posted 25 August 2012 - 09:13 PM

Thanks Hay Wilson. It looks like I've got some reading material to pour over. I watch your postings closely as I'm from the Central Tx region myself and am trying to produce a quality hay. I figured that entering it in the fair will tell me how I'm doing and where to go from here. I had soil test done and found out that I need to add 4 to 5 tons of lime per acre! I'm curious as to what effect this will have in yield and quality. The last cutting yielded approximately 1.5 tons per acre (2nd cutting) which was way up from the 1st. We're having a tough time recovering from the '11 drought and am looking forward to a wet year.

Thanks again for the input.

#7 somedevildawg

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Posted 26 August 2012 - 07:29 PM

yes i cut sumrall 007 every 20 days apply 30 lbs n 20 p 60 k had test high as 24%cp adf20 or less

What is sumrall 007 ? Curiosity killed the cat, haven't heard of that one.




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