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24x40 pole building will it be big enough?


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46 replies to this topic

#1 whitmerlegacyfarm

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Posted 12 August 2012 - 06:45 AM

Hey all i'm getting ready to build an equipment shed to try and get all my hay equipment out of the weather. I'm hoping i can fit it all in, i have 2 NH Small square balers, rolarbar rake, tedder, NH 479 haybine and also a NH self propelled 1469 HAYBINE. Im pretty sure i can fit this all in just thought i'd look for any advice before i start to build it this fall. Is 10ft high enough or should i go w/ 12ft ceiling? The SP Haybine should fit even w/ the 10ft height, just wonder if i can fit a wagon of stacked hay in if i only go 10ft. I'm closing in 3 sides and letting one of the 40ft sides open.

Of coarse i know they aren't ever big enough just limited funds and fill to level an area.

#2 gradyjohn

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Posted 12 August 2012 - 07:17 AM

I don't think so. Make a scale of each and one of the barn and see. You might have to pack them in but won't be able to get them out quickly.

#3 Vol

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Posted 12 August 2012 - 08:04 AM

Hey all i'm getting ready to build an equipment shed to try and get all my hay equipment out of the weather. I'm hoping i can fit it all in, i have 2 NH Small square balers, rolarbar rake, tedder, NH 479 haybine and also a NH self propelled 1469 HAYBINE. Im pretty sure i can fit this all in just thought i'd look for any advice before i start to build it this fall. Is 10ft high enough or should i go w/ 12ft ceiling? The SP Haybine should fit even w/ the 10ft height, just wonder if i can fit a wagon of stacked hay in if i only go 10ft. I'm closing in 3 sides and letting one of the 40ft sides open.

Of coarse i know they aren't ever big enough just limited funds and fill to level an area.


I would make the shed at least 60 feet long as you will not get the equipment listed in 40 linear feet. 12 feet high is better, but you can manage at 10....measure wagon bed heigth and then multiply however many bales you stack on wagon vertically by 14" and divide by 12" and that will tell you what heigth you need. It is a real PITA to deal with equipment stacked in front of each other. I would also consider the future....could I stack round bales in this shed?? could I stack square hay in this shed??.....plan for flexibility. I would make the knee walls at least 12' high along the backwall....you will be glad you did someday. Clearspan trusses.

Regards, Mike

#4 JD3430

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Posted 12 August 2012 - 08:12 AM

Yeah, I'd definately go 12' high or 14' if possible. If you can't afford to make it more than 40' long, then add another section to it later, but don't go 10' high as it's impractical to increase the height after it's built (although I once did that for a customer).
I have a 26' x 30' barn with 11'-6" ceiling and a 20' door and it's far too small. I can only fit my SP-1499, my M-7040 and my MX-8 bush hog in it now. Luckily, one of my customers lets me use the ground floor of his bank barn and I keep my balers in there. Still have to tarp a bunch of my equipment.

#5 somedevildawg

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Posted 12 August 2012 - 08:22 AM

I am building a 40 x 80 for my equipment and was thinking of attaching lean to's to each side for 80 x 80, thought i would use it to store hay in as well as equipment, that was until some kids came by playing with firecrackers and caught the rounds on fire! After that experience, I think I'll pass on having my equipment and hay stored in the same barn! Burnt so fast.....no way you could get that equipment out....just call the insurance company and hope you have enuf
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#6 Vol

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Posted 12 August 2012 - 08:25 AM

Whitmerlegacy, I might add that you might want to consider putting up the poles, trusses, and the roof this year....and then enclose the sides next year. That way you could possibly afford a bigger machinery shed and at least have a roof over your equipment now.

Regards, Mike
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#7 JD3430

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Posted 12 August 2012 - 08:41 AM

Yup, great idea. You're dry from everything but windblown rain. Then enclose the sides from ground-up as money allows.
You be surpised how many building materials suppliers will sell overstock siding or unclaimed orders to you for 50% off. You could even tarp the west side to keep most of the wind/rain out.

#8 rjmoses

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Posted 12 August 2012 - 08:49 AM

Rule #1 of equipment buildings -- They are roomy the first month after they're finished, just right the second month, and waaaay too small the third!

Figure out what you need now and double it! Example: The incremental cost to go from 30x50 to 40x70 usually isn't that much.

Ralph
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#9 swmnhay

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Posted 12 August 2012 - 09:26 AM

Rule #1 of equipment buildings -- They are roomy the first month after they're finished, just right the second month, and waaaay too small the third!

Figure out what you need now and double it! Example: The incremental cost to go from 30x50 to 40x70 usually isn't that much.

Ralph

Ditto That.

Going a little wider or longer doesn't add all that much.

Put up 60 x 90 last yr.I did alot of number cruncing and found that the 60' wide was most cost effective pr sq ft for me vs 50' or 80' wide.

Figure out what you can afford and build it twice that big!

I bit the bullet and did it like I'm only going to do this once.No regrets only that I wish it was bigger.My acreage is land locked and it was all the space i could build on.I had a larger shed ordered before finding out I had to stay 20' from property line.
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#10 ARD Farm

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Posted 12 August 2012 - 10:34 AM

I'd take a hard look at a Clearspan building, either Truss Arch or conventional hoop arch. Your cost per square foot is about 1/3 of a pole type building plus in many jurisdictions, a Clearspan isn't considered a permanent structure so it's not liable for property taxes.

I put one up on an engineered site because the grade sloped so I installed a retaining wall and backfilled to level, a 45 wide x 100 feet long x 16 feet high (to the truss center for ledd than 10 grand, sire imptovement included and my wife and I erected all the framework ourselves (with a front end loader on one of the tractors...

Mine has a metal roll up, commercial style overhead door at one end and man doors at each end. All my implements plus 2 tractors go inside plus around 50 rounds and a couple hundred squares. Thats hay plus 2 large frame Kubota's, a 575 square bailer, a 760 rounder, 3 mower conditioners, 2 rakes, a snowblower, my wifes buggy, 3 lawnmowers, 2 rototillers and a couple barn cats.

If necessary, you can drive in or back in a 13'6" rtactor trailer and load inside.

The cover shows no wear after 7 years (it's guaranteed for 12 BTW).

Because many jursidictions consider it a temporary building, lot lines and setbacks don't apply. Mine is 'secured' to the ground with screw in augers set in concrete in sonotubes, every 8 feet. The augers fasten to the truss frame via turnbuckles. It's never moved even in high winds, snow don't collect on the roof, it slides right off and the center top is a translucent panel so no additional lighting is necessary.

Check 'em out...... www.Farmteck.com

#11 swmnhay

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Posted 12 August 2012 - 10:55 AM

I'm not a big fan of the hoop barns.

HERE.

They blow away.

We pay prop tax on them like any other building.

When they price them they like to price just the building then you have to add the ends,pony walls and labor.So do your homework when comparing them with pole shed.

Hoop barns really jump in price when you get wider.

#12 urednecku

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Posted 12 August 2012 - 10:58 AM

I've had suggested to me to pick the size you wanna build, then stake it out on the ground with string & park your equipment 'inside' to make sure you have room to park, and move around.
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#13 ARD Farm

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Posted 13 August 2012 - 03:56 AM

I'm not a big fan of the hoop barns.

HERE.

They blow away.

We pay prop tax on them like any other building.

When they price them they like to price just the building then you have to add the ends,pony walls and labor.So do your homework when comparing them with pole shed.

Hoop barns really jump in price when you get wider.


Must be windy up north, more windy than here even though this is supposedly prime country for windmill generation......

Like I said previously, you have to check local zoning or jurisdictional laws, here they aren't considered taxable structures.

Mine came complete in the base price with end walls, overhead door and vents. I added the 2 man doors, thas it.

Mine isn't pony walled, it's on 2x12x20 ..40 retention PT planks, tied together with steel plates and anchored every 8 feet. in sonotubes filled with quick-crete.

For me, the RE tax savings alone makes it a viable alternative. I piss away enough tax money keeping the entitled in Cadillacs.

The only labor involved was my wife and I and 1 DeWalt 18 Volt drill-driver. I had a 'cover party' to put on the one piece cover, on a calm day, with plenty of beer and food. Made it on my birthday. Took 12 men, half crocked to pull it over.

The last addition I put on my machine shop, minus the floor, cost more than the Clearspan and it was only 20x30 with 10 foot high ceiling trusses, hardly enough for storage of implements. Fine for storage of machine tools however.

#14 swmnhay

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Posted 13 August 2012 - 07:22 AM

Must be windy up north, more windy than here even though this is supposedly prime country for windmill generation......

Like I said previously, you have to check local zoning or jurisdictional laws, here they aren't considered taxable structures.

Mine came complete in the base price with end walls, overhead door and vents. I added the 2 man doors, thas it.

Mine isn't pony walled, it's on 2x12x20 ..40 retention PT planks, tied together with steel plates and anchored every 8 feet. in sonotubes filled with quick-crete.

For me, the RE tax savings alone makes it a viable alternative. I piss away enough tax money keeping the entitled in Cadillacs.

The only labor involved was my wife and I and 1 DeWalt 18 Volt drill-driver. I had a 'cover party' to put on the one piece cover, on a calm day, with plenty of beer and food. Made it on my birthday. Took 12 men, half crocked to pull it over.

The last addition I put on my machine shop, minus the floor, cost more than the Clearspan and it was only 20x30 with 10 foot high ceiling trusses, hardly enough for storage of implements. Fine for storage of machine tools however.

Windmill country here also.I'm surrounded by them.I get to see the flicker in my window and listen to them make noise.ANNOYING!I'm located on the southern edge of what is called the Buffallo Ridge in SW MN.The first windmills have been up about 30 yrs??
http://www.lakebento...CF-D3D873A5A3C9}

HERE it seems like we get some straight line winds every 2-3 yrs in the 80-100 mph range and the hoop barns catch heck more so than the pole sheds altough they can blow away also.

There is alot of hoop barns in this area.I've helped retarp and rebuild a few!

Some brands are not insurable HERE.

#15 mlappin

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Posted 13 August 2012 - 07:59 AM

In our county hoop buildings are tax exempt, in my cousins county they are not.

We have four, two 38x72x19.5' and one 42x96x17 and one 42x96x19. Three are for hay and one is equipment. the smaller ones will hold 300 4x5 round bales stacked on their ends. The large one will hold around 500 4x5's stacked on end. The equipment one atm has a 16 row White forward fold planter, a 30 foot Hiniker bean planter, two tandem axle grain trucks with 20' beds, two Massey Ferguson Rotary combines, a MF 4880 four wheel drive tractor and a MF 8160 FWA tractor in it. The taller 42x96 for hay gained the extra height from using the 2'x2'x6' concrete blocks instead of the ground anchors.

P.S. Also have the ten foot Oliver superior drill I use to plant hay stored in the equipment building.
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#16 ARD Farm

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Posted 13 August 2012 - 11:49 AM

Being the frugal person I am (LOL), comparing the per square foot cost of a pole structure versus a Clearspan without costing in taxes, it's a better deal for me.

That may or may not be the case in every scenario and I'm not a carpenter but I can erect a Clearspan myself, or I should say my wife and I, an important (and cost saving) factor.

Asthetically, they aren't the prettiest face on the block but from a practicality and value standpoint, they are a winner here.

My partner has one as well and put a camper trailer inside one for a field office.

#17 whitmerlegacyfarm

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Posted 13 August 2012 - 08:32 PM

Thanks all for the input i think i'm going to go the route of stringin it up and see if equipment fits, right now i'm just running out of time I'm building this myself so i can always go bigger down the rd just have to find more fill to put behind it lol. And i willd just shoot a overhang off the back side. Thanks all

#18 JD3430

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Posted 13 August 2012 - 09:07 PM

I usually save projects like that for the winter. Got sooo much to do on the fields!!!!

#19 slowzuki

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Posted 14 August 2012 - 08:40 PM

We have a machine shed that is open on the long side, so at most 2 pieces are in each bay. Not sure I'd like to move to the have to move everything to get to the back style. Ours is 24 deep with 3x 12 ft bays and 2x 10 ft bays.

Moving along the building:
10 ft - square baler and rake
12 ft - 4 basket tedder plus junk
12 ft - wagon with hay or other stuff stored on it, sometimes the tedder and rake spend the winter on this wagon
12 ft - 400 ish small squares bales of sheep hay on pallets
10 ft - disc mower conditioner (mounted style) or some years 50 or so 4x4 round bales

Make it taller. Ours is on a hill so the first bay is only 7 ft sloping to the last bay is 12 ft or so. The 12 ft one is the only one tall enough to get a short load of hay in and safely get our 100 hp tractor in during the winter.

#20 swmnhay

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Posted 15 August 2012 - 08:39 AM

I usually save projects like that for the winter. Got sooo much to do on the fields!!!!

Ground gets kinda hard here in winter.LOL.Alot of pole sheds still go up tho with ice bits on augers.




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