Quantcast

Jump to content




Sponsors

Today's birthdays

No members are celebrating a birthday today

Recent Topics


Photo
- - - - -

What size is stronger?


  • Please log in to reply
21 replies to this topic

#1 Nitram

Nitram

    Hay Master

  • Members
  • 1,316 posts
  • LocationMarion Kansas

Posted 22 February 2012 - 10:15 PM

I have to replace boards on my stock trailer floor, the boards are 5 ft going width wise. Some are 2x12, 2x8, 2x6...My question is which size is strongest? My thought is the 12 inchers would possibly have more hoofs per board therefore more weight per board? I also need to have a runner down the middle welded so until then I really think another animal could break through again (don't ask! but didn't hurt the bull just scraped his knee and started a baaaddd day) your thoughts and input is appreciated Martin

#2 MorganT69

MorganT69

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 57 posts

Posted 22 February 2012 - 10:25 PM

I personally prefer the 2x6 boards on my trailer, that way if a board does go out on ya, its not that big of a hole.
  • Nitram likes this

#3 Mike120

Mike120

    Hay Master

  • Members
  • 1,582 posts
  • LocationHockley, TX

Posted 23 February 2012 - 06:48 AM

I like 2X6 as well. Years ago we replaced the floor on my father's stock trailer and he insisted on oak. We wore out two electric drills reflooring that trailer. I'm sure all the metal has rusted away on that old trailer, but the floor is probably still there.
  • Nitram likes this

#4 rjmoses

rjmoses

    Hay Master

  • Members
  • 2,292 posts
  • LocationNear St Louis

Posted 23 February 2012 - 08:43 AM

I redid a stock trailer some years ago with white oak 2x8's. They lasted forever!. A little oil on your drill bit helps also. Whatever you do, make sure you leave a breathing gap between boards for drainage. I use an 8 penny nail as my spacer.

Ralph
  • Nitram likes this

#5 CockrellHillFarms

CockrellHillFarms

    MrBaleMan

  • Members
  • 327 posts
  • LocationFreeman, MO

Posted 23 February 2012 - 10:32 AM

Martin,

My dad and I had that happen in our old trailer on the way to a sale. We got out at pizza hut to grab some dinner. I happened to hear what I thought was hoof on pavement. I looked under the trailer and sure enough. I saw 4 hoofs on the ground. Two from each bull in the trailer! That was scary but we got lucky. Didnt even have a scratch on them!
  • Nitram likes this

#6 Nitram

Nitram

    Hay Master

  • Members
  • 1,316 posts
  • LocationMarion Kansas

Posted 23 February 2012 - 11:40 AM

Bull endded outside with a #$%&**%$ blue healer chasing him down the road,wheat field,pastures. But he found some girls ;-)

#7 Tim/South

Tim/South

    Hay Master

  • Members
  • 1,941 posts
  • LocationCentral Alabama

Posted 23 February 2012 - 12:01 PM

The 6" and 8' boards with a gap will allow for more draining.
I also use white oak. It will last forever. I cut it a full 2" thick.
  • Nitram likes this

#8 Nitram

Nitram

    Hay Master

  • Members
  • 1,316 posts
  • LocationMarion Kansas

Posted 23 February 2012 - 12:03 PM

Cost of white oak vs pressure treated?

#9 NDVA HAYMAN

NDVA HAYMAN

    Hay Master

  • Members
  • 1,814 posts
  • LocationCentral Virginia

Posted 23 February 2012 - 12:30 PM

Martin, We always used white oak and then treated them with a roller and some concoction that my father mixed up. I would say that the price between the two should be similar if you can find someone local to cut the full thickness white oak. Now, if you don;t have any white oak in your area, then that's different. Mike

#10 Nitram

Nitram

    Hay Master

  • Members
  • 1,316 posts
  • LocationMarion Kansas

Posted 23 February 2012 - 12:35 PM

Mike called a couple...special order only :-(

#11 CockrellHillFarms

CockrellHillFarms

    MrBaleMan

  • Members
  • 327 posts
  • LocationFreeman, MO

Posted 23 February 2012 - 01:30 PM

One other story I just thought of. My grandpa was driving down the hwy (65= mph) with a bull in the trailer. Some how he forgot or didnt get it the back door latched. People started honking and flagging him down. He stopped and the door was wide open with NO BULL in the back! We looked for a few days and never found him. Even called people to tell them to kept an eye open. We figured he was gone. It took a week but we finally got him back. A guy with a small horse farm spotted him eating along his fence and opened a gate. Walked right in and made himself at home. Thankfully, he called the highway patrol and we got him back. I guess sometimes it pays to be lucky rather than good! And the bull didnt have anything wrong with him believe it or not. I'm not sure how that happens but it did!

#12 MUDUC

MUDUC

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • 10 posts

Posted 23 February 2012 - 05:00 PM

Had a guy that runs portable sawyer service cut up some oak logs for dad a few years ago. He told me that red elm makes the best decking boards for equipment trailers. Maybe more readily available from sawmills in your area than oak.

#13 NDVA HAYMAN

NDVA HAYMAN

    Hay Master

  • Members
  • 1,814 posts
  • LocationCentral Virginia

Posted 23 February 2012 - 05:21 PM

Yea, Didn't realize that you were from the great state of Kansas! Could always come to Va and take back one of our " Southern " tractors :)

#14 panhandle9400

panhandle9400

    Hay Master

  • Members
  • 436 posts
  • LocationNo Mans Land, OK.

Posted 23 February 2012 - 06:16 PM

They sale a replacement rubber fiber type board with cleats already made into them , unsure of the cost but here lots of them have been sold. I guess they last as long as the trailer if not longer. Resist water ,unrine, and manure. Cost of good wood they might be a option ? I do not know the name but I bet any trailer place would know about them or have them in stock . Have fun. Jeff
  • Nitram likes this

#15 MorganT69

MorganT69

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 57 posts

Posted 23 February 2012 - 06:59 PM

Martin, We always used white oak and then treated them with a roller and some concoction that my father mixed up. I would say that the price between the two should be similar if you can find someone local to cut the full thickness white oak. Now, if you don;t have any white oak in your area, then that's different. Mike


Around here the old timers took used motor oil and a mop and moped the boards ever so often for about 6 months, they claim the boards will out last the trailer.

#16 Blue Duck

Blue Duck

    www.blueduckmachine.com

  • Members
  • 265 posts
  • Locationsouth central Kansas

Posted 23 February 2012 - 07:21 PM

Martin, I have been told the lumber yard in Andale carries oak for trailer decking. You might give them a try.
  • Nitram likes this

#17 rjmoses

rjmoses

    Hay Master

  • Members
  • 2,292 posts
  • LocationNear St Louis

Posted 23 February 2012 - 09:24 PM

Another thought--prime the ends of your boards with an oil based primer. This will keep moisture from seeping in along the grain. (Do the same with fence posts)

Ralph

#18 Nitram

Nitram

    Hay Master

  • Members
  • 1,316 posts
  • LocationMarion Kansas

Posted 23 February 2012 - 09:32 PM

I now remembered a Roper/Rancher showed me his trailer where he used the ramps off a cattle trailer aluminum tread plate style add to cut them down but I didn't pursue it at the time. Maybe I should before the floor on my GN needs replaced. I think he said they pull them out of wrecks.

#19 Nitram

Nitram

    Hay Master

  • Members
  • 1,316 posts
  • LocationMarion Kansas

Posted 23 February 2012 - 09:35 PM

Mike if you have too many I have some extra room in the barn. Hope they don't mind the cold.... lol

#20 NDVA HAYMAN

NDVA HAYMAN

    Hay Master

  • Members
  • 1,814 posts
  • LocationCentral Virginia

Posted 24 February 2012 - 06:08 AM

As long as it doesn't get below 0 degrees! I will give you the oak but the freight is gonna be a killer!:cool:




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users