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Building an Inexpensive Buildings for storage of equipment & hay


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#41 tnwalkingred

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Posted 03 April 2012 - 04:12 PM

I just had a 40 x 60 barn built that has 16' clear. It is was built using 6 by 6 posts on 12' centers with metal trusses and 2 by 6 purlins. They put a 40 year warranty number 1 metal on the roof and also did the same on the west side that I had fully enclosed. I had a friend build it and the total for all materials and labor was $9100. I still need some gravel put in it which will be a extra cost but I was very happy with the product. I will try and post some pictures later on.

--Kyle

#42 Richardin52

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Posted 04 April 2012 - 06:26 PM

Where did you get your metal trusses?

#43 tnwalkingred

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Posted 05 April 2012 - 03:34 PM

All the materials were brought it by the guy who built it so I don't know where the trusses came from.

--Kyle

#44 Mike120

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Posted 06 April 2012 - 08:57 AM

I've seen a number of ads for folks selling metal trusses in Fastline. 40' seems to be the max because of transport costs and they often split them to go wider. They are not that difficult to build.

#45 hayward

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Posted 19 May 2013 - 01:44 PM

I bought a poultry farm 2yrs ago 4 32x500 broiler houses on 73 ac, didn't have a hay or equip barn so I started planning on building one, put up prefab commercial building for bout ten yrs, so I've built a few diff sizes. Ended up building one outa of chicken house trusses that I bought for 50$ set Thea barn is 32 x150 ft 12 ft eve. Took suna tubes to make 12" piers with a plate in concrete, then took an welded 5 ft pc of 8" channel iron in welded it to plate n set trusses on top of channel, actually truss sit down into channel about 7" . Trusses have clips on them bout 2' aperture for 2x4 purlins, I skipped every other clip n went with 4" metal purlins. Also used used tin from chicken house , coulda put new on for 3k more , used saved alittle money n works fine. Took same roof tin an cut it n half for sidewall sheeting, has bout 9' sheets on sidewall, this gives 3 foot opening on top foot on bottom for air. Ended up costing 8000$, 1000 paying one guy to help me stand trusses an put tin on. 7000 in materials altogether, it will hold 600 4x5 round bales

#46 cwright

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Posted 22 May 2013 - 06:22 AM

I just had a 40 x 60 barn built that has 16' clear. It is was built using 6 by 6 posts on 12' centers with metal trusses and 2 by 6 purlins. They put a 40 year warranty number 1 metal on the roof and also did the same on the west side that I had fully enclosed. I had a friend build it and the total for all materials and labor was $9100. I still need some gravel put in it which will be a extra cost but I was very happy with the product. I will try and post some pictures later on.

--Kyle

That is a darn good deal



#47 bluefarmer

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Posted 01 June 2013 - 04:13 PM

Hayward,what was the reason for using the channell iron vs.tall concrete pillar



#48 hayward

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Posted 01 June 2013 - 09:04 PM

To me that would have been a lot more work, as I mixed sackcrete (around 9000ibs) to pour piers ranging from 6 to 24 in . Ground was 4' out of level, I got it down to two feet out of level. Had to stop because I was starting to get high end down below ground surface. Shoulda used concrete truck to pour, but was worried they hit my forms r get stuck. Another reason if I were to hit it tractor r other equip it ( channel) would be easier to replace. Sure it could b done with tall concrete pier

#49 slowzuki

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Posted 02 June 2013 - 09:00 PM

They make concrete telephone poles somewhere around here, they would make a heck of a pole barn I would think.
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#50 bluefarmer

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Posted 02 June 2013 - 10:30 PM

thanks hayward I understand 



#51 slowzuki

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Posted 28 June 2013 - 01:16 PM

I've been pricing building materials the last few days and CCA treated poles 18 ft long are about 60$ a piece here.

The 7 ft concrete pilaster/pad precast units are 110$ each or so delivered but need additional post on top. Hemlock is about 25$ per post so total about 135 per.

#52 slowzuki

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Posted 04 July 2013 - 03:01 PM

Working up more info, priced treated sawn posts at 110$-170$ per post. I think I'll stick with poles!

Waiting on truss pricing to come back.

I've been trying to find the manufacturer of a common green painted agricultural steel truss used in a lot of sheds here. They are a pair of open web steel joists butted at the peak with a big hunk of 3/4 threaded rod as the collar tie giving a nice high ceiling. Used with 8-10 ft spacing so you don't need many of them. I though "Houle" the manure company made them but I can't find reference to them.

I've been pricing building materials the last few days and CCA treated poles 18 ft long are about 60$ a piece here.

The 7 ft concrete pilaster/pad precast units are 110$ each or so delivered but need additional post on top. Hemlock is about 25$ per post so total about 135 per.



#53 Richardin52

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Posted 11 July 2013 - 03:06 PM

Waiting on truss pricing to come back.


Anybody interested in learning how to make trusses really easy?

When I was in high school I worked for an old guy that was a he!! of a good carpenter. He always made his own trusses and I have always made mine ever since.

I'm sure you have all seen pictures of braces placed on a floor and parts placed into the braces and then gusseted together. Well forget that, too much work and too slow.

First figure out how many trusses you need. Then figure out how many gussets you need. Each truss except the end trusses will have gussets on both sides of the truss. Most of your gussets will measure 19 inches long by 9 1/2 inches wide. Cut this way you will have almost no waist from a 4x8 sheet of 1/2 plywood advanteck etc.
All you gussets can be ripped this way and then trimmed as needed to fit the peak or tails etc. of the truss.

Now look over you lumber and pick out the straightest pieces you can find, lay them on the ground and layout your truss using these members. After you have the truss layed out and the members marked for cutting make all the cuts and place them back together to check that everything fits, If they do put a "P" on them because they are your pattern. Use these to mark and cut the all the rest of pieces you will need for all your trusses.

Now take your pattern pieces and lay them back down on the ground and nail them together using gussets on just one side of the truss using 6 penny nails if you are using 1/2 inch gussets, use 4 penny if you are using 3/8 thick gussets. Do not use 8 penny because they will stick out way too far on the back side. A nail gun is almost a must nailing gussets.

As a general rule nails should be about kept 3/4 inch in from the edge and one inch on center over any contact areas on the gusset.

After you have your first truss nailed with a gusset on just one side flip it over and you have you patter and base to build every other truss on. When placing members on the pattern tack them down with 16 D nails with the heads left up about 1/2 inch, if you have a piece that is not strait just nail it to the patter and then bow it back into the correct position before putting on the gusset.

After the second truss is gusseted on one side pull any 16D nails and flip it over off the pattern then nail the second gusset on. Then start the third truss the same way and so on till all trusses are made.

A couple notes;
Make sure you put a mark on the right side of each truss so they all go on the building with that mark same side of the building and you do not flip one end to end by mistake.

If pieces are not strait it is always best to put the crown up even though you bend them back strait.

If you need a pattern to go by and do not trust yourself to design a truss you can go to your local lumber company and get a sketch of a truss the size you want with the snow load you want to go by.

If you cut the wood on your own property you can build trusses for the price of the nails and gussets material.

If you have to buy your lumber check around and compare the price of the material to a pre built truss. Once you have the material you can, depending on the size, build 50 trusses a day easy.
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#54 slowzuki

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Posted 11 July 2013 - 03:14 PM

My price came back - 30 ft trusses for 60 ft building - 32" centres, shed roof though, roughly 3500$. Ouch, about 150$ a piece.

#55 triabordofarm

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Posted 09 August 2013 - 09:30 AM

I have been checking out Farmtek's hoop buildings and they look great. I have my doubts if it will work for me though as I get around 150-200" of snow, and being almost 400' above Lake Michigan, I get a lot of wind. Farmtek hoops are about 30-40% less than conventional pole buildings. Anyone here have any comments on wheather the hoop style would work for me?



#56 Richardin52

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Posted 12 August 2013 - 12:32 AM

I put up a farmtek hoop barn on 6 foot walls. We are in a 70 lb. Per square ft. Snow load area. Barn is 36 by 60. The one I put up uses 4 inch pipes. I would not put one up in a snow area without this modification. Build a 2 by 6 plywood box beam 2 feet deep and 30 feet long and put it under the peak to support the center of the roof. I have a post supporting the beams in the center and have never had a problem. Box beams are easy and cheap to build.

#57 Fowllife

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Posted 13 August 2013 - 01:27 PM

I have been checking out Farmtek's hoop buildings and they look great. I have my doubts if it will work for me though as I get around 150-200" of snow, and being almost 400' above Lake Michigan, I get a lot of wind. Farmtek hoops are about 30-40% less than conventional pole buildings. Anyone here have any comments on wheather the hoop style would work for me?

Does that 30-40% less include the foundation cost for the hoop building, and everything else you would need for it (end walls?)

 

In my area there is very little difference between the 2 when all cost are considered, especially if you need to modify for a heavy snow load.

 

In my opinion, if there is no tax saving, and you don't plan on moving it soon you are better off with a pole building. Well, unless you are talking a truss span over 65' or so. That 65'-70' span is where pole barns start to get pricey, and hoop building start getting cheaper. It's also the range where traditional pre engineered metal building start to become more cost effective.



#58 slowzuki

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Posted 03 September 2013 - 03:25 PM

Worked with truss supplier a bit. Moving to 48" centres and eliminating overhangs - 30 x 96 building - 2500$ for trusses. Much better, putting them in the running against tarp building.

My price came back - 30 ft trusses for 60 ft building - 32" centres, shed roof though, roughly 3500$. Ouch, about 150$ a piece.



#59 Chessiedog

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Posted 03 September 2013 - 08:30 PM

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#60 swmnhay

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Posted 04 September 2013 - 06:40 AM

I've seen a number of ads for folks selling metal trusses in Fastline. 40' seems to be the max because of transport costs and they often split them to go wider. They are not that difficult to build.

My cattle shed has 50' steel trusses.The longer you get the heavier they need to be so price increases.






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