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sage grass


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#1 lp14255

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Posted 26 March 2011 - 10:55 PM

i have a feild that i'm trying to turn into a hay feild but it's filled with alot of sage grass, how do i get read of the stuff so i can grow better hay

#2 Toyes Hill Angus

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Posted 27 March 2011 - 12:23 AM

Control of Select Weeds on Pastures and Hay Land In Saskatchewan - FAQ - Agriculture - Government of Saskatchewan check out the link. Ihas conrol options for differnt invasive grasses in hay feilds.
more opions for different weeds here
www.utextension.utk.edu/publications/pbfiles/PB1521.pdf

Edited by Toyes Hill Angus, 27 March 2011 - 12:34 AM.


#3 bluefarmer

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Posted 27 March 2011 - 09:21 AM

LIME is the cure
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#4 Toyes Hill Angus

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Posted 27 March 2011 - 09:28 AM

Quite possibly soil ph could be out of whack, but before going to the expence of lime take a soil sample and have it tested, then you know for sure. As far as that goes, you can't properly do much of anything to the ground without knowing where you stand.

#5 dixietank

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Posted 27 March 2011 - 09:52 AM

Ph is definitely the answer. We have a lot that pop up unless you keep the field limed. Toyes is right, get a soil sample and talk with your local county agent. Down here if a field is heavy with sage we'll mow it, burn it off, lightly disk or hit with a renovator and then put down the lime and fertilizer to get as much INTO the soil as possible and avoid runoff when it rains.

#6 Vol

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Posted 27 March 2011 - 10:42 AM

http://www.plant-mat...etpmcfs8997.pdf High levels of Nitrogen works over time(4-5 years). Glyphosate will kill actively growing sedge. Regards, Mike

see also;
http://www.aces.edu/...roomsedge03.htm

Edited by Vol, 27 March 2011 - 10:46 AM.

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#7 Lotso

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Posted 04 September 2012 - 02:00 PM

Ph is definitely the answer. We have a lot that pop up unless you keep the field limed. Toyes is right, get a soil sample and talk with your local county agent. Down here if a field is heavy with sage we'll mow it, burn it off, lightly disk or hit with a renovator and then put down the lime and fertilizer to get as much INTO the soil as possible and avoid runoff when it rains.

What is an acceptable ph level to prevent the sedge?

#8 vhaby

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Posted 07 September 2012 - 11:21 PM

What is an acceptable ph level to prevent the sedge?


The previous commenters were writing about "sage" grass. A sedge is a completely different plant such as nutsedge.

Sage grass is an indicator of a low phosphorus soil as well as low soil pH. Soil phosphorus is tied up as aluminum phosphate in an acid soil. Liming he soil to raise pH releases much of this tied up phosphorus. The question you asked might be better answered by saying that to get more favorable grasses to grow, lime the soil to raise pH to about 6.0 to 6.2. In addition to raising the soil pH to a more favorable range for improved, higher nutritive value grasses, soil phosphorus also increases in availability for other forages.
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#9 Vol

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Posted 08 September 2012 - 05:01 AM

The previous commenters were writing about "sage" grass. A sedge is a completely different plant such as nutsedge.

Sage grass is an indicator of a low phosphorus soil as well as low soil pH. Soil phosphorus is tied up as aluminum phosphate in an acid soil. Liming he soil to raise pH releases much of this tied up phosphorus. The question you asked might be better answered by saying that to get more favorable grasses to grow, lime the soil to raise pH to about 6.0 to 6.2. In addition to raising the soil pH to a more favorable range for improved, higher nutritive value grasses, soil phosphorus also increases in availability for other forages.


I suppose it depends on what area of the country you live in....Broomsedge is often called sage grass HERE in the Southeast.....it is a grass and many years ago was used to make brooms.

http://www.hiltonpon...Week020108.html

http://plants.usda.g...le?symbol=anvi2

Regards, Mike
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#10 vhaby

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Posted 12 September 2012 - 02:47 PM

I suppose it depends on what area of the country you live in....Broomsedge is often called sage grass HERE in the Southeast.....it is a grass and many years ago was used to make brooms.

http://www.hiltonpon...Week020108.html

http://plants.usda.g...le?symbol=anvi2

Regards, Mike


Thanks for the links. We are writing about the same grass. The name broom"sedge" appears to be a misnomer. A sedge usuall is found to have a triangular stem, which sagegrass does not have.

Vincent




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