Quantcast

Jump to content




Sponsors

Today's birthdays

No members are celebrating a birthday today

Recent Topics


Photo
- - - - -

Pasture and Hay Ground Rent


  • Please log in to reply
11 replies to this topic

#1 downtownjr

downtownjr

    downtownjr

  • Members
  • 1,560 posts

Posted 31 May 2010 - 04:23 PM

Curious to Pasture and Hay Ground rents in other areas...here I am paying $30 an acre for my pasture rental in NC IN and $75 for my hay ground and some that is a (me) 3/5 - 2/5 split...did have a nice square 18 acre hay field offered with established alfalfa/OG for $125 an acre. However, a big time row cropper knocked on the door and offered $175 and burned the hay field and planted soybeans...wanted to cry because it was a nice field, planted two years ago...looked great...no weed problem...easy 6 ton an acre field.

#2 BCFENCE

BCFENCE

    Hay Master

  • Members
  • 490 posts

Posted 31 May 2010 - 04:42 PM

I give 25 dollars an acre for pasture and i have to keep the fences up.
  • downtownjr likes this

#3 Hayking

Hayking

    Hay Master

  • Members
  • 199 posts

Posted 31 May 2010 - 10:12 PM

farm ground in northern oklahoma good enough to grow alfalfa or corn ranges anywhere from 40-80 bucks a acre.
  • downtownjr and rollinwheels67 like this

#4 swmnhay

swmnhay

    Hay Master and Moderator

  • Moderators
  • 4,000 posts
  • LocationReading,Mn

Posted 01 June 2010 - 06:52 AM

I hear pasture rent is around $50 if you can find any.The CRP program took a lot of pastures.If there is a creek running threw them they pay $85 acre in this county.The county south of me it is $125.The GUBERMENT was bound and determined to get the cows out of creek pastures.At first they tried passing a law that you had to fence off all the water so cows couldn't get in it.The cattle groups protested and the bill did not pass.WELL the next yr they offered a CRP program for the pastures and a lot of pastures got enrolled.The guys renting pastures can't compete with that,and a lot of those cows went to kill.

I like wildlife but I think this is going to come back to haunt us.Where is are beef going to come from down the line,some foriegn country?

Hay ground here is gonna be what ever the corn/bean farmers are willing to pay.225-250 acre.Down from $300+.

I hear a few of the high bidders are giving up land or want it for less than they had offered.Or they are in financial trouble.:rolleyes:
  • downtownjr likes this

#5 mlappin

mlappin

    Hay Master and Moderator

  • Moderators
  • 6,171 posts
  • LocationNorth Liberty, Northern Indiana

Posted 01 June 2010 - 09:07 PM

I hear a few of the high bidders are giving up land or want it for less than they had offered.Or they are in financial trouble.:rolleyes:


Hehe, heard a story of a guy several county's over, got 500 acres rented at $300 an acre one fall for seed corn, signed a 5 year lease, lost his seed corn contract before spring. Went to the land owner and wanted to sign a new lease, land owner said "nope, you offered to pay that, I expect to get that for the next five years". Most of the land rents in the area run from $70 to $150 an acre. Very well drained or irrigated ground can go for more, but not so much as it was a few years ago.

Most of my hay rents are between $60 and $80 an acre, if it's actually worth more than that, I'll go with row crops on it. Most of the time the hayfield's I have the landowner approaches me as they like looking at a hayfield instead of corn and beans, or they have young children around and like the ideal of minimal chemical use on a hayfield.

Edited by mlappin, 01 June 2010 - 09:09 PM.

  • downtownjr likes this

#6 NEHerdsman

NEHerdsman

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 86 posts

Posted 02 June 2010 - 07:44 AM

I used to rent about a 20 acre pasture for $300 year, I had to supply water and maintain the fences. When the owner died a couple years ago, his kids took it over, first thing they did was double the rent. But they reseeded the pasture, and installed all new electric fence (both paid for mostly by some gov money), so I didn't mind that at all - no more running over there in the middle of the night to chase cows off the road. I gave one of the sons kids a bottle fed calf, and they bought another from me, and decided they wanted to raise beef too. So now they're taking care of the day to day stuff, including rotational grazing which has allowed me to keep animals there about a month longer than I used to. So that still cheap money as far as I'm concerned.

Most of my hay land I pay nothing for, but those are smaller fields - former farm fields that have had a house grow up in the middle of them, and the homeowners want the fields maintained. I tell them that I'll cut them when it's right for me, not for them, and they're ok with that. I picked up another one last year from a guy who called me - the field had good grass, but needed serious fertilizing, so right now I'm charging him for haying it. Has responded nicely already though, I just took some very nice bales off of that land.

I've often thought that it would be easier to go rent a single piece of land that would yield as much hay as the smaller fields combined, that would run me about $100 an acre around here. I may be forced to do that as more of my larger fields fall to development...
  • downtownjr likes this

#7 Barry Bowen

Barry Bowen

    Freeland Hay Maker

  • Members
  • 154 posts

Posted 11 July 2010 - 08:13 AM

I pay my land lords a percentage of what I can sell the hay for. Protects me on the down years like 09 and 09, but lets the land lord get better rent on the up years. Average right now is 60-90 and acre. On a really good year the percentage has come out as high as 125. If I am doing well, I think they should share some since they are exposed to the down years also. Several smaller pieces are free, or just keep a small area around a barn mowed. Honest to god crop ground is going for 80-125 around here. Several land lords have been burnt though by people offering to pay 150 for corn and bean ground, and then never making any payments to the land lord.
  • downtownjr likes this

#8 Haymike56

Haymike56

    Hay Master

  • Members
  • 122 posts

Posted 20 July 2010 - 01:13 PM

I pay $.70 per Cow Calf unit per day for pasture. They maintain the fences but if there is something major wrong I will help fix it. The hay ground is either 50/50 or I will pay $75.00 / Ac.
  • downtownjr likes this

#9 OKHay

OKHay

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • 15 posts

Posted 31 July 2010 - 09:12 PM

I just rented 80 acres of pure Bermuda grass for $30 an acre in North East Oklahoma. This seems to be around the low side of the average in the area ($25-$40 an acre).

#10 nosliw

nosliw

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 87 posts

Posted 01 August 2010 - 02:17 PM

i pay $10 per acre on one farm that's HEAVILY wooded. it's 78 acres total, but there's probably only 18-20 acres of decent hay ground. i get about 50 rolls off it on a spring cutting and probably 30 in the fall. definately not a killer deal but it's close to home.

i pay $700 a year for 83 acres of endophyte infected fescue and clover to my grandfather. there isn't any fence.
  • downtownjr likes this

#11 OKHay

OKHay

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • 15 posts

Posted 01 August 2010 - 04:16 PM

Here's a Fact Sheet form Oklahoma State University extension on pasture rental rates for 2008-2009. The sheet shows data on Oklahoma, Kansas, Missouri, and Texas. http://osufacts.okst...216web08-09.pdf
  • downtownjr likes this

#12 UpNorth

UpNorth

    Hay Master

  • Members
  • 207 posts
  • LocationNorthwestern NY

Posted 30 August 2010 - 03:11 PM

On the dairy ground in the NE part of WI you can't even get in the door for under $200 an acre. The central sands will rent between $30 and $50 an acre. My home area in the NW has been around the $75 to $120 an acre.
  • downtownjr likes this




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users