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lacing belts


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#1 CaptainQ

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Posted 02 February 2010 - 09:33 AM

I am new to round baling and have purchased a Hesston R540 in really nice shape, but it appears that a few of the belts may need to be relaced or are close to needing it. I have read in my manual that all belts must be within two inches of the same length ( I believe that is what it said, I can look again) I have the chevron belts 7in. and they have the zipper lacing not the titan. My question is short of taking all the belts out, which looks like a huge job, how do I know if they have been relaced before so that if I need to relace a few I don't end up with a few too short. And if they need relacing do I buy the tool and do it myself or take the belts to someone to have it done, or can they do it on the machine? Any additional tips on this or the use of the machine would be greatly appreciated. It is a 2000 model R540 Hesston 4x4 bale electric tie no gathering wheels or kicker, we mainly bale as a hobby, aprox. 1000 squares with a J.D.336 and just got the Hesston to reduce labor.

#2 swmnhay

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Posted 02 February 2010 - 10:19 AM

If you have to replace a couple belts you may find others are to short if splices have been replaced.To do it rite and as long as you are replacing a couple I would take them all out and measure them to make sure.It would be a good time to replace all the splices and pins.You can add a piece of belt to old belt to lengthen it.Belts should be the same type and ply if you replace some of them.

I'm looking in my Shoup book they sell replacment belts and splicers.They have a lever lacer that you can do in the field.Shoup Manufacturing Company Call them for a catolog it has way more than the online version.
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#3 CaptainQ

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Posted 02 February 2010 - 02:27 PM

There doesn't appear to be any splices, not to say some ends have not been cut off and relaced. Does anyone know how much shorter than factory belts can be given that they all are the same length, and do you have to taper the trailing edge. Also just how difficult is it to take all the belts out and then how do you feed them back in, do you take all out at one time or one at a time and is there any way to measure them on the machine? Also if you are just reading this post, read my first a couple before this because there are a few more questions. Thanks

#4 Heyhay..eh

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Posted 02 February 2010 - 02:48 PM

If you are not putting a lot of bales through your baler or using it for custom where it has to be up to the pace everyday then you might have a little more latitude with your belts.

Yes you can replace lacing with the belts in place on the baler. just rotate the belt so that it shows the lacing below the bottom back roller with the gate about 1/4 open. Take out old pins, cut lacing square and apply new lace. you will have to position each belt individually so make sure that you have given enough slack to rotate them by hand.

If you are going to take out your belts to measure them then tie twine to the trailing end of the belt, as you pull it out. do this separately for each belt leaving each twine in place to assist in the replacement process. lay out all the belts and measure each to determine lengths. Cut to suit as per your spec in manual. If you are short then, as swmn indicates you can add in some belt to get back to length. If you are going to do this then replace a few feet of belt to give you some working room and to ensure that your lacing is not too close together. You can also use this approach to replace damaged sections of an otherwise good belt. Just be liberal in cutting out so you get into some good belting to make the splice. When you are ready to replace your belts tie the leading edges to your twines and pull them back trough the baler with the twine.

While you have the belts out it might be a good time to inspect your rollers and bearings. Make sure you tie off your guide twines before you get in the baler to inspect... oh and lock it out as well so the gate does not close on you.

As to the type of lacing to use there is some information on this thread http://www.haytalk.c...ess-belts-1370/ Make sure that you can apply the lacing that you opt for on your baler. If you can use alligator as opposed to clipper lacing then you can make the lacing jig with a piece of channel or you can buy the jig for 400 or so dollars. Look to the alligator web site and you will see all the components of the jig. I made my template in wood and a machinist made the pilot hole and stopper holes for me. We used compression pins for the stoppers and a bolt and bar system for the belt holder. Worked like a charm. Oh and use a smaller hammer than they suggest especially if you tend to pound harder than the average yuppie engineer.

Take care

Edited by Heyhay..eh, 02 February 2010 - 02:52 PM.

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#5 Heyhay..eh

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Posted 02 February 2010 - 06:44 PM

To your second post

I don't think that you should have your belts shorter than the length specified in your manual. That should be the minimum length. The variation in relative size between belts would allow for stretch or splicing inserts. You should have an adjustment roller, perhaps the bottom, back roller on your gate (I have a JD so I am using it as the reference) which should allow you to adjust the tension on the belts somewhat.

Leading edges need not be trimmed but in the event that you do not get your laces just right then your belt edges may be in peril. My preference is to trim at a 45' angle Just a little piece of the corner. Before I did any belt repair on the baler I bought some clips and old belting and did a few practice splices. As I was using alligator lacing I only put in 3 nails each time. Then I was able to salvage the lacing from each try. $25 per lacing set.

I tried to measure on the machine but found that the margin for error was going to be too great and the process to difficult. You basically have to rotate each belt by hand all the way around and measure it foot by foot. so measure mark it turn it and again.

Good luck!

#6 Ridgerunner

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Posted 03 February 2010 - 05:55 AM

I am assuming you have not baled with the baler since you purchased it, nor are you familiar with its history. I would recommend removing all of the belts and checking the roller bearings. Nothing worse than a smoking bearing when you start baling. While the belts are out, you can measure them and if necessary, cut them to the same length. I have a Hesston Rounder 5580 and my belts are 1.5" less than the recommended length. I also trim the corners of the leading edge. I recommend lacing your own belts. You need to have the tools handy and have the experience. Sooner or later you will break a belt in the field and need to make a quick splice. The only other alternative would be to have a spare belt or two already made up and ready to go.

Your manual should have a diagram for how to route the belts when you put them back in. It should also tell you the safest way to remove the tension in the belts. Personally, I open the gate and then chain the tensioner roller up to one of the top rollers and then close the gate. My manual recommends putting wood blocks under the tensioner arms while the gate is open. Some balers have locations for locking pins to secure the tensioner arms.

If you buy a clipper lacer, I recommend the type you put in a vice. Shop around. A lot of industrial supply places carry clipper lacers. Often as much as 1/2 the price of the farm equipment stores. E-bay often has antique clipper lacers pretty cheap.

#7 swmnhay

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Posted 03 February 2010 - 07:58 AM

Was looking thru Shoup catolog.It says do not mix Flexco (aligator) and Clipper lacing on the same baler.Why,I don't know.

After having the Alligator splices in the last 4 balers I've had I would strongly reccomend them over the clipper lace.I've never had one tear out.

I don't know if it is feasible for you but you could put new 3ply rough top belts with alligator splicing in for 189 a belt.The 3 ply chevron with clipper lace 222 and with aligator lace are 232.

Depends on your situation but you would have all new belts the same length with new splices.

#8 Heyhay..eh

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Posted 05 February 2010 - 12:36 AM

Was looking thru Shoup catolog.It says do not mix Flexco (aligator) and Clipper lacing on the same baler.Why,I don't know..


I think that the reason they say not to mix lacing is that the alligator lacing are not recommended for rollers under 3" (I seem to recall that as a criteria) whereas the clipper lacing have no such limit. Other than that I would not see the problem with having different lacing on different belts. Having 2 types of lacing on the same belt might cause problems as each has a different tear strength. So using a clipper to splice in a section on a belt that already has an alligator could be the issue they are addressing.

Deere uses another type of lacing Think it is Mato or something like that. Don't have the information handy but they are more like an alligator than a clipper lace.

I also have moved over to alligator and find them much more reliable and serviceable than the previous clipper.

Take care

#9 Hay DR

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Posted 05 February 2010 - 12:52 AM

Was looking thru Shoup catolog.It says do not mix Flexco (aligator) and Clipper lacing on the same baler.Why,I don't know.

After having the Alligator splices in the last 4 balers I've had I would strongly reccomend them over the clipper lace.I've never had one tear out.

I don't know if it is feasible for you but you could put new 3ply rough top belts with alligator splicing in for 189 a belt.The 3 ply chevron with clipper lace 222 and with aligator lace are 232.

Depends on your situation but you would have all new belts the same length with new splices.

Alligator lacing's are not recommended for all balers. Yes your Vermeer M baler comes OEM with Alligator lacing and it is a great application. Some balers have smaller rollers and will stress the Alligator or plate style lacing. For the Hesston 540 design clipper style lacing's are recommended. Usually the belts on a 540 Hesston baler dry rot or oxidize before they are worn out. You put large amounts of hay through your Vermeer 605M baler but usually 540 Hesston's are owned and operated on small operations. The clipper lacings do just fine for the 540 Hesston balers.

Just as a point of reference we sell the 7" x 366" 3 ply Chevron OEM belt for the 540 Hesston baler, USA made, for $180.00 each delivered to anyone in the lower 48 states. Round Baler Belts and Belting

#10 kickinbull

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Posted 06 February 2010 - 03:20 PM

we purchased a NH 630 roller several years ago. It had different style belts on it. Had a couple of them out to fix and we measured them, both were shorter then company specs. They were all too short. It would never roll a bale to full capacity without lots of strain. Well, we ordered a full set of new belts(HAY DR) and it is just like a new one again.




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