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How do you pattern your cutting and baling?


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#1 Marshall

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Posted 25 August 2009 - 09:53 PM

My question is how do you guys find the most time effective way to cut and bale your hay?

Do you go all the way around the field and make circles until you get to the middle of the field?

Or,

Do you go back and forth from one end to the other and then do the ends?


My father wants me to go back and forth and with all the time it takes me to turn around and while the blades are going over already cut hay, I think it would better if I were going all the way around the field with the blades cutting grass the entire time.

What is your way you do it?

Thanks,

Marshall

#2 Heyhay..eh

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Posted 25 August 2009 - 11:32 PM

I go around in ever diminishing circles (squares, rectangles etc) As that is the most effective for my type of equipment (mower).

Some of my neighbours go back & forth but that means that they have to open the field before they get on to do the major part of their mowing so it is a 2 stage process for them. Open the field, bale that portion, then cut the rest and bale.

When I make square the baler is offset to the right so it is easy to follow the swaths. Making rounds with that pattern is more of a challenge, the corners usually have to be cleaned up (unless you have gathering wheels).

Some custom baling is done on the back & forth pattern and the time you spend out of the swath with the baler (round) is about the time it takes to clean up the corners and with an offset baler you would be better off with the circle pattern. I have never tried an inline square baler so I can't say for certain what that would be like but I can assume that it would be similar to a round baler on corners.

Take care

#3 OhioHay

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Posted 26 August 2009 - 05:32 AM

We mow four rounds around the field and then go back and forth(self propelled discbine). This seems much more efficient for the type of machine we have and the small fields we work in...2 to 25 acres. As for baling, whether round or inline square with accumulator, once again we go around to open up the field, then basically go wherever we want. With them being inline, we don't have to worry about running over hay, so we bale whatever way seems most efficient. Normally some form of back and forth.

#4 OneManShow

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Posted 26 August 2009 - 10:47 AM

We mow with a NH 1412 Discbine. It's offset to the right side of the tractor. First pass is made counter clockwise. Then the rest of the field is mowed clockwise. We nearly always ted the same day. We rake so that we don't have any sharp corners-hard to explain-but the windrows are concentric, north south and east west but the corners are open, so we can drive in or out of the field at any corner without driving over windrows. The outside windrow ends up as two swaths raked together. We bale mostly with an inline baler so we can turn any which way without too much problem which gives us some more options with how we rake. Takes me awhile to get re-acclimated to our old NH575 -catch myself tryin to make a sharp left turn every now and then-kinda gets a guy's attention. We do what works best with our equipment in our fields -largest is 42 acres, smallest is 9 acres and all are sort of oddball shapes- I try to keep the windrows as long and straight as I can. So do whatever works best for you-try it your way and your dad's way and see which method puts the least number of hours on your equipment maybe you can give dad a good "I told ya so"-That's always kinda fun.

#5 rank

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Posted 26 August 2009 - 02:31 PM

round and round misses hay and is hard on PTO shafts IMO.

#6 mlappin

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Posted 26 August 2009 - 02:51 PM

round and round misses hay and is hard on PTO shafts IMO.


Exactly. Unless a person likes changing u-joints or owns major stock in a company that makes the crosses that is.

I take six outside rounds off with a 13' discbine then find the straightest side of the field to start working back and forth on. Anytime I have any wet clumps it is in the corners from either the tedder of the rake not getting it all. I mow with a White 2-110 and use Over while mowing, right before I get to the end I shift down into Under and by time I get right to the end, I'm going just slow enough to lift the mower without getting into the inside endrow while not leaving any hay. Even if part of the inside row does get hit by the blades again, its such a small percentage of the field over all its hardly worth mentioning.

When I ted I'm tedding two rows at a time, I go around the outside twice, start tedding where I started going back and forth, then when done with that, I ted the inside two outside rounds to make sure the ends that I turned on are completely tedded.

When raking I start with my V wheel rake on the straightest side of the field, rake all the rows, then rake the outside rows last. Basically to finish up I rake the outside six rows last on three sides of the field.

If the outsides are still a little tough, I can actually make the turn at the end of the row without getting into the inside endrow when round baling.

Far as which is more efficient, I always thought as long as the mower is moving, one shouldn't be any more efficient that the other when considering its a PITA to get all the hay mowed, tedded, and raked properly in the corners not to mention the u-joint issue.

#7 Lazy J

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Posted 27 August 2009 - 09:32 AM

We mow with a NH 499 and open the field with 6 rounds, then mow back and forth for the rest of the field just like if you were combining. This makes it soe much easier to combinde windrows.

Jim

#8 haybaler101

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Posted 27 August 2009 - 11:50 AM

Mow six rounds with 13 ft. center pivot mower, then back and forth on the longest, straightest side. On our own fields, this is also the way the ground was worked with tillage equipment. No matter how good of soil preparation, you cannot stay in the seat going 10 mph crossways. We also rake the ends last for a neater field.

#9 BCFENCE

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Posted 27 August 2009 - 03:56 PM

Ive got a 1409 discbine and mow around in circles, Never had a problem missing hay.
THOMAS

#10 Jake_NEIA

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Posted 27 August 2009 - 05:14 PM

Ive got a 1409 discbine and mow around in circles, Never had a problem missing hay.
THOMAS



That why you are always dizzy Thomas? LOL



You guys saying that going in circles is hard on CV joints. How can that be? Wouldn't making a 90* turn be easier on things then a 180* turn?

Jake

#11 Rodney R

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Posted 27 August 2009 - 07:40 PM

I can understand why folks with a side pull haybine might mow round and round the field. But on a long fiel that makes sooooo many short rows, and so much turning.... Like said before - 4 rounds around the outside, and then back and forth on the nicest side - Did anybody ever notice where the cab is on a balewagon - it's in front of the front wheels, and if you drive other then the direction than where the dirt was worked, it'll be bumpy. Not to mention all of the corners - there is a 50% chance that a bale will come out on a corner, and a 99% chance that it will be knocked over - the less turning the better!

If you had to run a a disk or a drill in the same field, would you go round and round, or back and forth?

Rodney

#12 BCFENCE

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Posted 27 August 2009 - 08:20 PM

I got to be honest rodney i run a cultimulcher over my fields, then i sow witha brillon seeder and the fields are smoth either direction you want to go, as far as cutting on every corner you have to turn no matter if you go back and forth or go around the field the same amount of time is going to be spent turning around.
As far as raking i like to make 2 or 3 rounds then rake back and forth , It easier like that and like you say it is easier to go the way the field is worked, makes alot smother ride. I use an accumalator so i try not dumping on the ends if i can help it, sometimes i can and sometimes i cant.

#13 Farmboy

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Posted 27 August 2009 - 09:13 PM

I go around my field with the mower rake and baler. I don't tedd the hay.

#14 rank

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Posted 27 August 2009 - 09:18 PM

You guys saying that going in circles is hard on CV joints. How can that be? Wouldn't making a 90* turn be easier on things then a 180* turn?

It sure doesn't seem like it. If you make the 180 turn, you can use the all of the headlands to make kind of a gradual semi circle.

#15 Rodney R

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Posted 28 August 2009 - 07:21 PM

BC - I can see that if you have the field worked in all directions, then it would be easy to cut and bale in all directions. I guess the thing is that we prefer to do the 180 and go back another row, rather than turning a corner. I always hated going around corners even when we had thrower wagons - seems like we'd either wiss part of the roll - either with the rake or baler - or the bales would come out the thrower on a corner. Do you cut in a circle all the way to the center, or when it gets near the end you just go back and forth on each side?

Rodney

#16 BCFENCE

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Posted 28 August 2009 - 07:47 PM

Your right and i can see where your coming from, Once i get pretty close to the center i just cut back and forth but till then i just go around the field, but i do rake it back and forth that makes it alot easier baling, When dad farmed he would always rake around the field and i think that takes up too much time turning around all the time, but i guess everyones diffrent that makes the world go around, LOL
THOMAS

#17 mlappin

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Posted 28 August 2009 - 10:45 PM

You guys saying that going in circles is hard on CV joints. How can that be? Wouldn't making a 90* turn be easier on things then a 180* turn?

Jake


The ninety degree turn has to be done NOW, while turning around when going back and forth can be done over the six outside rounds. With a thirteen foot discbine you have almost 80 feet to do that turn in.

#18 nwfarmer

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Posted 29 August 2009 - 10:06 AM

I make 2 trips around the field to open up the field. Then depending on where my farm road is in relationship to the field I may go across the bottom the third time so when I finish I am at the farm road.

I'm lazy and don't like to move too many bales. When I bale I go around the field clockwise twice straddling the inner most one cut by the swather. that picks up the ends of the rows and doesn't leave too many bales where they have to be moved.

I then start baling down a row and at the end skip about 6 rows, working my way across the field. Picking up row 2 and at the end skipping 6 rows.

I bale my end rows, top and bottom last because the swather runs over those as I cut and they dry slower because of the wheel tracks. They usually have to be raked. If I rake them before I start baling by the time I bale them last they are perfect.

#19 Grateful11

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Posted 03 September 2009 - 11:38 PM

"We mow with a NH 1412 Discbine. It's offset to the right side of the tractor. First pass is made counter clockwise. Then the rest of the field is mowed clockwise."

I always mow the first round clockwise and the rest of the field the same with our Haybine offset to the right. Then go back and mow the outer edge last. I'd rather run over the outer edge first, usually the worst looking hay and go back mow it down last.

#20 mlappin

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Posted 04 September 2009 - 08:59 AM

Some of my neighbours go back & forth but that means that they have to open the field before they get on to do the major part of their mowing so it is a 2 stage process for them. Open the field, bale that portion, then cut the rest and bale.


Why would they have to wait until the outside rounds are baled before they can finish mowing? Get to the endrows, lift the mower, swing it to the opposite side, drop it back down and mow. With a little practice the mower can be lifted while getting all the hay mowed but without getting into the mown endrow and can be dropped back down to get all the hay without getting into the inside row.

Strangely enough I mowed 25 acres the other day, same farm but the guys driveway cuts it in half. With something like that and two sets of outside rounds to make, I don't feel like I'm getting anything done until those outsides are down and I can finally get working back and forth.

Like I seen in another post as well, when opening a field regardless of what side the mower is on I always drive so the tractor is running hay down on the very outside round. If you have any kind of treelines or woods this is almost always the lighest hay in the field anyways.




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