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Accumulator Vs. NH Balewagon


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#1 Hayguy

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Posted 02 March 2009 - 08:53 PM

Can anybody here share some average times for loading and unloading into the barn using an accumulator system? I'm guessing maybe 10 minutes to load a 200 bale load and about 15 minutes to unload and stack in the barn. If I remember right, we used to be able to load our 1010 NH balewagon in about 5 minutes. That worked fine for roadsiding stacks or for a real short haul. Seems to me that pulling 1 or 2 wagons with 200 bales each would be a lot more efficient for any haul over 1/4 mile or so.

#2 hay wilson in TX

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Posted 04 March 2009 - 08:14 PM

Each has it's own advantages. The bale wagon is a one man/lady operation. Granted one man can load with a grapple and do reasonably well. The major advantage of the accumulator is the versatility of places where you can stack hay. A Stack Wagon pull or self propelled is more demanding of the storage facility.

I can put 160 bales an hour in the barn with my 1003 NH Balewagon. That is two trips an hour. I have used a 1010 and my wife used a 1002 which added up to 110 bales a round trip for the two machines. I can put more bales in less time into the barn using the 83 bale NH 1003 machine.

The self propelled can pick up 165 bales and haul them to the barn at 45 mph, on pavement. I understand at least one of these machines has a computer controlled stacking and the stack sits up square not leaning back like the very old NH 1010, or the newer NH 1003 or a more modern NH 1034. With the computer stacking on the self propelled machine you can take hay out of the barn using a grab.

At first look it appears the accumulator system is less costly, but when needing hay wagons or flat bed trailers are priced into the mix I think it is about a wash as for cost per bale to get hay into the barn.


As long as I stay with my limitations I can cut, rake, bale and stack in the barn with no help.

#3 BCFENCE

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Posted 04 March 2009 - 08:17 PM

People tell me if you use a bale wagon you have to bale longer heavier bales, Is their anything to this.
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#4 ohiohaymakr

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Posted 04 March 2009 - 10:01 PM

Bale length varies by model of balewagon ,either 2 bales or 3bales wide. The sides of the balewagon are adjustable also. Bales need to be consistant length and the more solid the bale the better.

#5 Hayguy

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Posted 04 March 2009 - 10:23 PM

We ran a Hoelscher accumulator for 1 season and there too if the bale length varied more than a couple inches, the 1st table would eat the next bale out of the balecase. I've seen or read where some guys were using a grapple fork to unload an NH balewagon. I suppose it was because the wagon wouldn't tip upin their barn. To me that seems to cancel the real advantage of using a stackwagon - the fast unloading time.

#6 hayfarmer

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Posted 04 March 2009 - 10:36 PM

I use a 1033 bale wagon (pull type) that holds 104 bales a load. My fields are approximately 3/4 mile from my barn. I average 2.5 loads an hour. When I bale the field next to my barn I can average 2.5 to 3 loads an hour. The major disadvanage with the stack liner is you can not stack the hay on pallets. I have a wooden floor in my barn but have had a mold problem with the bottom bales. I going to try using a preservative this year to see if it stops the mold. With a stack liner I need one tractor and one operator to pick up the hay and stack it in the barn. The problem I see with the accumulator is that it takes 3 tractors and at least two operators to make the system efficient. You also need a lot of room to unload the trailers and stack the hay in a barn. My baler operator never bales more than 200 bales ahead of me. That way if it starts to rain I don't lose more than 100 bales. With two bale wagons or one self-propelled wagon you can keep up with a 575 square baler. My friend has a 1037 bale wagon. When we help each other we can easily stay ahead of a 575 baler thats baling 400 to 450 bales an hour. You can buy a good 1033 for under $10,000 and a real good 1037 for 15,000 to $23,000.

#7 gwillie44

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Posted 05 March 2009 - 08:53 AM

Put tar paper down before you drop your stack of bales. This will stop moisture from coming up through the floor.

#8 dennis

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Posted 05 March 2009 - 12:30 PM

Out west (wa state) we use the newer nh balewagons mostly 2-wide (88 bales) (44" X 16" X 18")(100 # bales) or bale wagons that stack 3-string bales.
We use 1068 bale wagon and 3 580 nh balers. We hire a tarping co. to completly tarp our hay-top-bottom-sides for $9+ a ton. hay will look as good coming out as when it was stacked. The tarping crew also peaks the top.

#9 OhioHay

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Posted 05 March 2009 - 04:58 PM

We chose to go with the accumulators over balewagons due to distance. Farthest hay fields are 15 miles from home. Our goal is not necessarily to get the hay all loaded and stacked in the barn the same day. We try to bale 3,000 bales a day and get it all on wheels. This does require some investment in wagons and trailers. Then it all goes home. Sometimes it gets unloaded that night and sometimes the next morning or a combination of the two.

#10 OhioHay

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Posted 05 March 2009 - 04:59 PM

Do you get any dust or discoloration on your bottom layer using the tar paper?

#11 ButchAutomatic

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Posted 05 March 2009 - 07:31 PM

We have a BW38 self propelled, when roadsiding hay 3 1/2 loads hour ( 160 bale loads ). We have hay fields up to 10 miles from the barns, then we use a stack retriver to get down the roads Fast 70 MPH. I think the accumulator method you have more wheel traffic on the hay field.

#12 Rodney R

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Posted 05 March 2009 - 07:54 PM

We've had both the 1089 and the BW 38 and both of them will handle 36 inch bales that weigh about 45 lbs. That is not a long OR heavy bale. That's a nice bale, or at least I think so. Granted, heavier bales work MUCH better on the machine, but you gotta make what the customers will buy. And a PT balewagon will more easily work with 36 inch bales, and I think they'll even go smaller.... say 34 inches. HOWEVER, the lenght of the bales HAS to be consistent..... Too many short bales gives a crappy stack, too many long bales gives the operator lots of practice trying to make the bales fit in the machine. True, the sides are adjustable, BUT it takes about an hour to make all the changes, and it makes very little sense to change the machine when it's easier to change the balers..... The key is the bales - they'll either make the day terrible or average...

1 Sp wagon will outrun a 575, if the haul is under 3 miles. 2 575's will stay ahead of an SP wagon.


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#13 ohiohaymakr

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Posted 05 March 2009 - 11:10 PM

We use plastic as moisture barrier,than 3-4 inches gravel covered with 1/2 inch conveyor belting. Use loose straw under hay to prevent molding

#14 VA-Hay

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Posted 17 October 2009 - 03:41 PM

I tried using a NH 1033 Stack Liner balewagaon in 2008. It can really pick the hay up fast. I bale alfalfa and orchard grass. The alfalfa is heavy and the bale wagon had no problems handling these bales. The orchard is lighter and hay baled earlier in the day is heavier and has no problems being picked up by the bale wagon. Later in the day, the orchard grass get lighter and can be difficult for that bale wagon to pick up. The pickup head just flips it all around and it doesn't fall nicely onto the 1st table of the balewagon.

My lessons learned are these. My hay farm is located in Central VA. There we have many small and odd shaped fields and hills. The bale wagon works best on long straight rows. It got so frustrating trying to pick up hay in field corners with the balewagon that I finally gave up and just picked those bales up by hand. On the hills, it's best to pickup traveling up hill. That way the the 1st and 2nd beds of the bale wagon are throwing hay down hill rather than up hill and works best. To use a bale wagon in our area it's important to mow and rake so you don't have turns, only straight rows to pickup. The balewagon just can't handle the corners.

Also, the wagon needs 14 - 15 feet of clearance to raise up and unload a 7 bale high stack. One of my barns is about 13.5 ft high and I had to empty the stack at the front of the barn and hire high school football players to move the hay inside and stack it. This really slows things down and still costs money for the help, which I've been paying all along. My hope for the bale wagon was to use less help.

In 2009 I have returned to pulling wagons behind the baler and I have two men on the wagon stacking. Wagons are unloaded using a bale grab on my front end loader. This works well in my barns. And in my new barn I can stack bales 10 high with the loader, that's 3 bales higher than with the balewagon.

My wagons are 20ft long and to go as fast as my Hesston 4570 baler will bale, I need 3 men on the wagons. But at that speed, it's difficult for the men to keep their balance and handle the hay. So I'm loosing a lot of time pulling the wagons. I'm hoping to buy an accumulator to pull behind the baler for 2010 haying. This should be faster, allowing me to use the full speed of the baler. This plan requires 3 tractors and 3 men working full time. One tractor baling, one loading and pulling wagons to the barn, and one unloading. It's easier for me to hire retired equipment operators to drive tractors than it is to find young labor to stack hay by hand. I'll have to wait to see how things go if I get the accumulator.

#15 nwfarmer

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Posted 17 October 2009 - 04:52 PM

Out west (wa state) we use the newer nh balewagons mostly 2-wide (88 bales) (44" X 16" X 18")(100 # bales) or bale wagons that stack 3-string bales.
We use 1068 bale wagon and 3 580 nh balers. We hire a tarping co. to completly tarp our hay-top-bottom-sides for $9+ a ton. hay will look as good coming out as when it was stacked. The tarping crew also peaks the top.


Dennis, do you use Inland Tarp to do your tarping? Also do you run corrugations or do you use a sprinkling system? In Wyoming the corrugations slow my baling and stacking a lot. Interesting you use the 16 by 18 bales instead of the 14 by 18. Female horse people around here don't like to lift those heavier bales.

#16 okhillbilly

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Posted 19 October 2009 - 09:14 AM

As far are costs are concerned the accumulator system is a whole lot cheaper. A NH stacker new cost around $150,000 (priced in 2000).Plus a barn tall enough to unload under. An 10 bale accumulator and grapple will run under $20,000. Add a couple of 25 foot gooseneck trailers with the capacity to haul 232 bales 6 high stack with a 8 bale tie stack for around $4000 each. Add a truck or two($40,000) to pull the trailers that everybody should have anyway and add a tractor for $25,000 your still under the cost of a new stacker. And you can unload into a standard barn with 10-12 foot walls. Prices for equipment will vary on what each individual wants or has or weather your talking new or used. If your going to look at what is cheeper one piece of equipment used for moving hay or 7 pieces of equipment half of you can use on other jobs around your farm. Just my opinion.

#17 nwfarmer

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Posted 19 October 2009 - 04:48 PM

VA-HAY,
You can add or remove metal blocks on table 1 of the NH 1033 stack wagon to load on hills and slants.

I do have to physically pick up bales in the corners.

#18 Rodney R

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Posted 19 October 2009 - 06:52 PM

If I had to pick up all the bales by hand in corners or slants, I'd pick all of them up by hand. An accumulator will work better on hills, and depending on how many bales a guy handles an accumulator is the way to go, and a stackwagon would be over kill. I have no experiece with the pull type models, but I can see that long straight fields would be best of them, as I would expect that they are awkward to maneuver, both in the field, and at the stack. An SP will easily pick bales in corners, is very easily maneuverable, but then you run into the 17ft unloading height, it's really big on the roads around here, and it's heavy.

Rodney

#19 nwfarmer

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Posted 20 October 2009 - 08:28 AM

The SPs are faster. Travel on the road fast also. However, they do have an exhaust pipe and up here we have had several hay stack fires where hay has gotten near the exhaust pipe. I've never used one.

#20 dennis

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Posted 20 October 2009 - 05:05 PM

Dennis, do you use Inland Tarp to do your tarping? Also do you run corrugations or do you use a sprinkling system? In Wyoming the corrugations slow my baling and stacking a lot. Interesting you use the 16 by 18 bales instead of the 14 by 18. Female horse people around here don't like to lift those heavier bales.


We have Tarp-It Inc. do our tarping, and I highly recommend there work. They will usually have the stack tarpped within 24 hours after calling them.
We irrigate with sprinklers either circles or wheellines which is much easier on equipment then corrugations.
We bale 16 x 18 bales because you can't get the truckers to haul the smaller bales. Most of our hay sales are 200 to 300 miles from our ranch. The ladys don't like it but have learned to deal with it.




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