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Aggrand liquid fertilizer?


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#1 Farmerboy

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Posted 29 July 2008 - 02:34 PM

Has anybody here used this fertilizer? I am just getting ready to apply it for the first time.

#2 JKTexas

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Posted 02 August 2008 - 05:53 PM

I just started to look at this also and would be very interested on what happens and more importantly how you are applying it.
I was told that you needed to apply it with about 20-25 gallons of water an acre. That means a lot of trips back to the hose:)

#3 Farmerboy

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Posted 03 August 2008 - 12:53 PM

I was told by the rep to water it down to about 1 gallon of product with 50 gallons of water per acre. With a 200 gallon 3-point sprayer that is a lot of trips!

#4 JKTexas

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Posted 13 September 2008 - 07:07 PM

:confused:I just got some literature that says to use 1 gallon per 25 gallons of water per acre.
I also read, in the literature where one rancher did 100 acres for $900.
There are some conflicting reports here.
I am beginning to think this may be more of a selling scheme than something that works.
I am still looking at this.

#5 Farmerboy

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Posted 13 September 2008 - 10:26 PM

I applied it to just one field at the 1-50 mixture and was really pleased. I got my best 3rd cutting ever with the fertilizer. Next year I will definitly use it extensively.

#6 Production Acres

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Posted 15 September 2008 - 12:10 PM

Nitrogen will cost almost the same for the various types of N available. Urea may be $1.2/lb, amoinia may be $1.1/lb, etc. And a 5-10% spread is understandable and justifiable, but when dry fertilizer costs you $125/acre or whatever, and liquid fertilizer costs only $40/acre, red light bulbs should go off in your head, and you should run!
As I understand it, liquid fertilizer is a great tool when used in an existing weed control program ( you combine a 2,4-D application and a fertilizer application) or in an irrigation program where you are already applying water and already have equipment running over the farm. But applying one application of 15-5-5 foaliarly does not equal one application of 60-30-60 granual fertilizer. 4 applications of the liquid would get the nitrogen correct, but that is also 4 trips across the field.
we would not sell phosphate mined in russia, put on a boat, shipped to new orleans, put on a barge, sent up the missippi, put on a truck, shipped to a coop in MN, put on a spreader truck and applied to your farm ( and there are many, many tons spread across the US) if liquid fertilizer would do the same job for 1/5 the price. THE WHEEL IS NOT BEING REINVENTED!
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#7 Farmerboy

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Posted 15 September 2008 - 04:46 PM

I don't think that this is something new or that it would work for everybody but for me and my situation liquid fertilizer works best. I like the fact that it is cheaper, organic, and easier to apply.

#8 Production Acres

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Posted 16 September 2008 - 07:43 AM

I don't think that this is something new or that it would work for everybody but for me and my situation liquid fertilizer works best. I like the fact that it is cheaper, organic, and easier to apply.


If you like it, use it but I keep hearing how cheap it is, but how much does a pound of N cost?
We don't use much bagged fertilizer, but today, 34-0-0 costs $670/ton, thus for 680# of nitrogen it will cost $670 or $0.98 dollars per pound.
Urea today 46-0-0 costs $970/ton, thus for 920# of urea it will cost $970 or $1.05 dollars per pound.
How much does a pound of liquid N cost?

#9 OhioHay

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Posted 18 September 2008 - 01:41 PM

I think that you guys are comparing apples to oranges. I am guessing that at that low of a rate that this is a foliar fertilizer. I don't think you can compare actual lbs put on the soil to the efficiency of a foliar. I am not saying one way is better than another, just different and hard to compare on a $ per lb of N basis. We have used some foliars with mixed results, used dry for years, but think we had to over apply to get the benefit due to nutrients being tied up and dry fertilizer adds lots of salt to the soil. We are now using poultry litter, both layer, broiler, and turkey, plus feedlot manure. I think all will work, but you need to fit you situation.

Edited by OhioHay, 18 September 2008 - 01:43 PM.

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#10 Production Acres

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Posted 19 September 2008 - 12:27 PM

No, we are not comparing apples to oranges, or if we are please show me truthfully how I can fertilize 100 acres with $900.
We too use hundreds of loads of manures each year, but if you don't know what each pound of nitrogen or P or K costs, you are farming with someone else's money or else you don't rely upon farming for your income. For example some of our broiler houses don't clean out every time and the manure becomes more concentrated and some tested 104-98-44 this spring. this summer some litter where they are cleaning out more often is testing 23-80-70. And some horse manure we used only tested .3-8-11. Interestly, one grower who used to spread for me had a 16' spreader truck and claimed he was hauling 7-8 tons per load. Another grower has a 20' spreader bed and claimed he was hauling 10-15 tons per load. We just bought a 24' spreader with sideboards and we weighed it - 13 tons! The 24' bed with sideboards in volume holds twice the load the 20' spreader!
Manure has all kinds of benefits, but we must know how much we are paying per pound of actual N-P-K, and we have to know how much bedding we are buying, and how much $4.5/diesel we are burning.
If you are fertilizing a 10 acre field, the math isn't that important, but spread over a couple thousand acres and those dollars start becoming important.
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#11 OhioHay

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Posted 20 September 2008 - 09:47 AM

I am not disagreeing that you must know your costs. I have raised hay for 19 years and wouldn't still be doing it if I didn't know my costs. What I am saying is that foliars are supposed to be more efficient, thus you need less total lbs per acre as none of it is being tied up by the soil. I have been told that it is 10 to 1. Will have to do some research to see if that number is true. I don't know anything about aggrand, but have done some work with other companies with mixed results. As for fertilizing for $9 per acre, I imagine that is per cutting per acre. When we did foliars, you had to apply that before 1st and then after each cutting. So 4 cuttings would actually run you $36 to $ 45 per acre depending if you applied after the 4th cutting. I am not trying to start a fight here, but there are many many wasy to fertilize and one has to find the product and cost structure that works for him or her in their region of the country.

As for tons of manure on a spreader, moisture content and manure content would make a great difference. The layer litter we use is heavier than broiler and would add up to more tons on the same size load. Also we cleaned one house with a water issue and boy was it heavy.

Edited by OhioHay, 20 September 2008 - 03:46 PM.


#12 msparks

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Posted 02 February 2009 - 09:55 PM

You have to realize that the %N you get from the AGGRAND product does not equate to what is listed on the bottle.

AGGRAND is a highly formulated organic fertilizer made from Fish/Kelp. It contains microbes that activate when they are mixed with water and spread on your fields. After about 14 days microbial activity will have increased over 2100% (Must be warm out)

90% of your N will come from the air (which is 78% Nitrogen). This is why this product works so well.

If you have really poor soil, it won't work as well. If you have no organic matter in your soil, again won't work.

Next, is the fact that you are not using chemicals which decrease microbial activity as well as keep the earthworms out of your soil. 1 acre of healthy earthworms can produce over 700 lbs of castings per day. Again that's another "free" source of nutrients to your grasses.

I would be glad to answer more questions on this product.
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#13 TBrown

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Posted 03 February 2009 - 12:44 AM

if you are telling me you are fixing nitrogen from the atmosphere straight to soil with Aggrand, you just reinvented the wheel and are doing something everyone wishes they could accomplish. Also, you see commercial fertilizers having a serious salinity problem in soil? Please explain this. I also believe you need to do some more research on the effect of chemicals and Aggrand on Microbial populations. I don't quite buy what you are saying. Just my 2 cents worth.

#14 gwillie44

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Posted 03 February 2009 - 07:41 AM

N,P,K keep your weeds under control, pick a good variety of seed that fits your needs. After that a farmer can start to micro manage. ie: micro nutrients, new type fertilizers ect. just my 2 cents

#15 Production Acres

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Posted 03 February 2009 - 08:18 AM

AGGRAND is a highly formulated organic fertilizer made from Fish/Kelp. It contains microbes that activate when they are mixed with water and spread on your fields. After about 14 days microbial activity will have increased over 2100% (Must be warm out)

is there something magic about fish/kelp or will cow manure/straw work, or how about chicken parts/chicken litter/pine shavings, or horse manure/pine shavings. they have to be favorable to earthworms as well, and they have plenty of residual value and anyone who spreads manure knows how much microbial activity and worm activity there is in these products, but short of bags of manure at wallmart, they will never trade at much more than about 75% of what chemical fertilizer costs for the same amount of basic nutrients.

If what you are saying is verifiable, why doesn't every Co-oP and feed store in america sell this product?

#16 msparks

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Posted 03 February 2009 - 08:53 PM

if you are telling me you are fixing nitrogen from the atmosphere straight to soil with Aggrand, you just reinvented the wheel and are doing something everyone wishes they could accomplish. Also, you see commercial fertilizers having a serious salinity problem in soil? Please explain this. I also believe you need to do some more research on the effect of chemicals and Aggrand on Microbial populations. I don't quite buy what you are saying. Just my 2 cents worth.


Conventional fertilizers supply N as salt. Salts dissolve quickly in soil, releasing N. Salt-based fertilizers toxify the soil which reduces soil microbe and earthworm populations, which reduces nutrient cycling, decreases soil organic matter content, increases soil compaction and damages soil structure.
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#17 msparks

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Posted 03 February 2009 - 09:32 PM

is there something magic about fish/kelp or will cow manure/straw work, or how about chicken parts/chicken litter/pine shavings, or horse manure/pine shavings. they have to be favorable to earthworms as well, and they have plenty of residual value and anyone who spreads manure knows how much microbial activity and worm activity there is in these products, but short of bags of manure at wallmart, they will never trade at much more than about 75% of what chemical fertilizer costs for the same amount of basic nutrients.

If what you are saying is verifiable, why doesn't every Co-oP and feed store in america sell this product?


Other Organic materials also supply microbes. Not saying those other products don't work. The liquid fish/kelp is just easier to use, since it can be sprayed on which also gives you the advantage of a Foliar Application. Foliar feeding can be more efficient especially at certain times of the growing cycle when more nutrients are needed. ie seedling emergence, after cuttings, etc. With foliar feed you can get more nutrient uptake if your soil isn't as fertile to give good root uptake.

AS far as stores that carry it, etc. Well I'm working on that, meet with one guy at the Co-op during the TN Horticulture Expo this past weekend. I'm going to try to get the products at least on the shelf for home growers and such. I just don't see it being sold in bulk, as the pricing would not be as good.

I've also had some folks take one look at the bottle and say the analysis is too low for it to work, so it's an uphill battle (Kind of like I'm getting here)
Anyhow, I've had a few hay growers here in TN that had success last year. One guy in Bon Aqua, TN had a nice increase in yield on 70 acres and he will be buying again this year.

#18 msparks

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Posted 03 February 2009 - 09:45 PM

is there something magic about fish/kelp or will cow manure/straw work, or how about chicken parts/chicken litter/pine shavings, or horse manure/pine shavings.


I was also going to say, that I believe you will find a higher concentration of micro-nutrients, enzymes and amino acids. The Kelp and Sulfate of Potash also has sulfur in the sulfate form which is readily available to the plant. Sulfur must be present in sufficinet amounts in the soil and plant tissue to realize the benefits of Nitrogen and Potassium.

#19 TBrown

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Posted 04 February 2009 - 08:56 PM

Man I am begining to think I should rethink what I learned in 6 years studying soil science in college. Never once did I hear of a "Special formulation" with the power to convert N gas in the atmosphere to nitrate or ammonium. Last I knew it took high pressure and energy to complete this process. With a nutrient content of 4-3-3, and a liquid weight of 8.43 lbs/gallon, with a application rate of 1 gallon per acre, you will be applying
.34 actual lbs N, and .26 actual lbs P and K. its going to take an awful lot of product to get anywhere close to the nutrient requirements for hay production even if you believe liquid fertilizer is more available (which is debatable). 100 lbs per acre is going to take a lot of gallons at .34 lbs/gallon. You claim that your AgGrand product doesn't work well on poor soils, maybe that has something to do with the lack of nutrients actually being supplied. A possible reason for you thinking it works well on soil with higher organic matter levels is due to the nutrient supplying power of the soil for P and K, add a little nitrogen and boom grass grows and looks green. The only information I can find on the reduction of soil microbes is if you use a denitrifcation inhibitor such as Nserve which is benefical to reducing the amount of nitrogen made unavailable to plants. I would have to agree with Calvin that the best way to influence microbe populations is the addition of organic matter such as manures or composts. If you apply more than .34 lbs N per acre, with adequate amounts of carbon such as wheat straw or cornstalks from manure applications you will balance your C:N Ratio increasing microbial activity. If applying commercial fertilizers has such a salinity effect on soil, then why isn't there salt problems in the midwest where we receive adequate rainfall to leach salts out of the soil profile? From my knowledge of soil science, the amount of accumulated salts in soils from fertilizers that recieve adequate amounts of rainfall to leach the salts from the soil are very minimal and have insignificant effects on soil physical characteristics. This is just my opinion, I am not going to claim to be an expert, but I would recommend sticking to the horticulture industry who doesn't need near the nutrient requirements as hay production.

#20 msparks

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Posted 04 February 2009 - 10:04 PM

Well I didn't come on here to argue, I guess we will just leave it as that. If you want to learn more about these types of products, maybe take a look at Rodale's guide to organic gardening.

If it works in Horticulture, it will work on hay. My hay customers are happy with last years production, and I'm sure they will be this year as well.




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